Table-talk of John Selden

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J. R. Smith, 1856 - 170 sider
 

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Side 43 - Equity is a roguish thing; for law we have a measure, know what to trust to; equity is according to the conscience of him that is Chancellor, and as that is larger or narrower, so is equity. 'Tis all one as if they should make the standard for the measure we call a foot, a Chancellor's foot; what an uncertain measure would this be!
Side vi - What things have we seen Done at the Mermaid! heard words that have been So nimble and so full of subtle flame, As if that every one from whence they came Had meant to put his whole wit in a jest And had resolved to live a fool the rest Of his dull life!
Side 98 - The oracles are dumb ; No voice or hideous hum Runs through the arched roof in words deceiving ; Apollo from his shrine Can no more divine, With hollow shriek the steep of Delphos leaving ; No nightly trance, or breathed spell, Inspires the pale-eyed priest from the prophetic cell.
Side xxxvii - Peter, kill and eat, leaving the choice to each man's discretion. Wholesome meats, to a vitiated stomach, differ little or nothing .from unwholesome; and best books to a naughty mind are not unappliable to occasions of evil. Bad meats will scarce breed good nourishment in the healthiest concoction; but herein the difference is of bad books, that they to a discreet and judicious reader serve in many respects to discover, to confute, to forewarn, and to illustrate.
Side 132 - THE Proverbs of several Nations were much studied by Bishop Andrews, and the reason he gave was, Because by them he knew the minds of several Nations, which is a brave thing ; as we count him a wise man, that knows the minds and insides of men, which is done by knowing what is habitual to them.
Side 76 - Ignorance of the law excuses no man ; not that all men know the law, but because 'tis an excuse every man will plead, and no man can tell how to confute him.
Side 1 - Philological Proofs of the Original Unity and Recent Origin of the Human Race, derived from a Comparison of the Languages of Europe, Asia, Africa, and America. 8vo, cloth. 6s (original price 12s 6d) Printed at the suggestion of Dr. Prichard, to whose works it will be found a useful supplement. JONES' (Morris Charles) Valle Crucis Abbey, its Origin and Fountion Charter.
Side 168 - The Pilgrim Fathers— Collections concerning the Church or Congregation of Protestant Separatists formed at Scrooby, in North Nottinghamshire, in the time of James I., the Founders of New Plymouth, the Parent Colony of New England.
Side 78 - I CANNOT fancy to myself what the law of nature means, but the law of God. How should I know I ought not to steal, I ought not to commit adultery, unless somebody had told me so! Surely 'tis because I have been told so.
Side 2 - WESTMORELAND and Cumberland.— Dialogues, Poems, Songs, and Ballads, by various Writers, in the Westmoreland and Cumberland Dialects, now first collected, to which is added a Copious Glossary of Words peculiar to those Counties. Post 8vo, (pp. 408), cloth. 9s.

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