Correspondence of William Pitt, earl of Chatham, Volum 3

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William Pitt (Earl of Chatham), William Stanhope Taylor, John Henry Pringle
John Murray, 1839
 

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Innhold

The King to Mr Pitt July 29 Announcing that he has created
21
John Calcraft Esq to the Earl of Chatham November 25
25
Sir Edward Wilmot Bart to the Earl of Chatham August 5 Congratulations on his being called to the helm
27
The Rev Edward Wilson to the Countess of Chatham August 16
34
General Burgoyne to the Earl of Chatham August 21 Con
41
The same to the same August 21 Weaknesses of the King of Prussia Mr Stanleys mission to Russia
48
The Duke of Grafton to the Earl of Chatham August 22
54
The King to the Earl of Chatham August 29 Recommends a journey to Bath
60
The Right Hon Hans Stanley to the Earl of Chatham Sep
64
The Earl of Chatham to Colonel Barre September 20
72
The Right Hon Henry Seymour Conway to the Earl of Chat
78
The Duke of Grafton to the Earl of Chatham October 4 Lord
88
The Earl of Chatham to the Earl of Shelburne October 5 In reply
96
The Earl of Hertford to the Right Hon Henry Seymour Con
117
Edgecumbe for refusing the bedchamber 126 The same to the same November 25 Soliciting the postoffice
130
The same to the same November 29 Expressive of indifference
135
The Earl of Bristol to the Earl of Chatham December 29
144
The Duke of Grafton to the Earl of Chatham January 8
150
The Earl of Chatham to the Right Hon Charles Townshend
153
James Boswell Esq to the Earl of Chatham January 3 Gene
159
The Earl of Bristol to the Earl of Chatham January 8
166
The Right Hon Henry Seymour Conway to the Earl of Chat
172
The Earl of Bristol to the Earl of Chatham January 29
179
The Earl of Chatham to the Earl of Shelburne February 3
190
The Duke of Grafton to the Earl of Chatham February 8
198
The Earl of Shelburne to the Earl of Chatham February 16
206
The Earl of Shelburne to the Earl of Chatham February 16 Present state of the Indian business
212
referring the question of the right to parliament 216 The Earl of Chatham to the Duke of Grafton February 23
218
The Duke of Grafton to the Earl of Chatham February 28
224
The Earl of Chatham to the King March 7 Attributes the
230
The Earl of Bristol to the Earl of Chatham March 19 Debate
236
The Earl of Shelburne to the Duke of Grafton December 13
298
The Right Hon James Grenville to the Countess of Chatham
306
The Duke of Grafton to the Earl of Chatham January 21
311
The Countess of Chatham to Lord Camden January 23
317
Lord Camden to the Earl of Chatham March 20 Anticipated
323
The Countess of Chatham to Sir William Draper June 25
329
The Countess of Chatham to the Duke of Grafton October 8
336
The Earl of Chatham to the Duke of Grafton October 14
342
The Earl of Chatham to the Earl of Bristol October 30 Begs
348
The Marquis of Granby to the Earl of Chatham April 27
354
Earl Temple to the Earl of Chatham July 11 Expresses
361
Granby may not go to the place where it rains snares 365 The Right Honourable George Grenville to the Countess
366
The Earl of Chatham to John Calcraft Esq January 7 Pro
384
John Calcraft to the Earl of Chatham January 8 Lord Granby
390
John Calcraft Esq to the Earl of Chatham January 16
396
John Calcraft Esq to the Earl of Chatham January 20
399
The same to the same January 24 Proceedings in the House
408
The Marquis of Rockingham to the Earl of Chatham February 1
414
John Calcraft Esq to the Earl of Chatham March 3 City
423
John Calcraft Esq to the Earl of Chatham March 17 Con
429
John Calcraft Esq to the Earl of Chatham March 24 Pro
432
The Earl of Chatham to John Calcraft Esq March 30
438
The Marquis of Rockingham to the Earl of Chatham April 27
445
The Right HonouraHeWillrani Dowdeswell to the Earl of Chatham
455
The Earl of Chatham to Mr Sheriff Townshend May 23
459
The Honourable Colonel Simon Fraser to the Earl of Chatham
465
The Earl of Chatham to the Earl of Shelburne September 29
471
The Duke of Rutland to the Earl of Chatham November 19
478
The Earl of Shelburne to the Earl of Chatham November 11
484
intended motion on the affair of Falklands Islands
491

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Side 452 - gainst self-slaughter ! O God ! O God ! How weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable Seem to me all the uses of this world ! Fie on't! O fie! 'tis an unweeded garden, That grows to seed; things rank, and gross in nature, Possess it merely.
Side 244 - I only wish the circumstances were such that your lordship could have an opportunity of showing the interest you take in the fate of a people who well deserve the favour of so illustrious a patron of liberty as your lordship. I have communicated to General Paoli...
Side 235 - Here this extraordinary man, then chancellor of the exchequer, found himself in great straits. To please universally was the object of his life ; but to tax and to please, no more than to love and to be wise, is not given to men.
Side 234 - ... with a confidence in him which was justified even in its extravagance by his superior abilities, had never in any instance presumed upon any opinion of their own. Deprived of his guiding influence, they were whirled about, the sport of every gust, and easily driven into any port ; and as those who joined with them in manning the vessel were the most directly opposite to his opinions, measures, and character, and far the most artful and...
Side 427 - Representatives of the people are essential to the making of laws, and there is a time when it is morally demonstrable that men cease to be representatives. That time is now arrived. The present House of Commons do not represent the people.
Side 247 - Paris in spite of my teeth and my doors, and I see has given a foolish account of all he could pick up from me about King Theodore. He then took an antipathy to me on Rousseau's account, abused me in the newspapers, and exhorted Rousseau to do so too: but as he came to see me no more, I forgave all the rest.
Side 235 - He was truly the child of the house. He never thought, did, or said any thing but with a view to you. He every day adapted himself to your disposition ; and adjusted himself before it as at a looking-glass. He had observed (indeed it could not escape him) that several persons, infinitely his inferiors in all respects, had formerly rendered themselves considerable in this house by one method alone. They were a race of men (I hope in God the species is extinct) who, when they rose in their place, no...
Side 386 - I mean the House of Commons. With one party he was a patriot of the first magnitude; with the other, the vilest incendiary. For my own part, I consider him merely and indifferently as an English subject, possessed of certain rights which the laws have given him, and which the laws alone can take from him.
Side 385 - A breach has been made in the Constitution — the battlements are dismantled — the citadel is open to the first invader — the walls totter — the Constitution is not tenable. — What remains then, but for us to stand foremost in the breach, to repair it, or perish in it...
Side 402 - My Lords, this is not the language of faction ; — let it be tried by that criterion, by which alone we can distinguish what is factious, from what is not — by the principles of the English constitution. I have been bred up in these principles, and know that, when the liberty of the subject is invaded, and all redress denied him, resistance is justified.

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