Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, Volum 3

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Jared Sparks
Little, Brown, 1853
 

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Side 522 - I have the honor to be, with the highest respect, your Excellency's most obedient and most humble servant.
Side 290 - To agree upon the number of land forces, and to make requisitions from each state for its quota, in proportion to the number of white inhabitants in such state, which requisition shall be binding; and thereupon the legislature of each state shall appoint the regimental officers, raise the men, and clothe, arm, and equip them, in a soldierlike manner, at the expense of the United States...
Side 326 - Were it possible for this circumstance to justify in your Excellency a determination to lend us your personal aid, it is evident from the universal voice, that the presence of their beloved countryman, whose talents have so long been successfully employed in establishing the freedom of kindred states, to whose person, they have still flattered themselves they retained some right, and have ever looked up, as their dernier resort in distress, would restore full confidence of salvation to our citizens,...
Side 302 - I assure your excellency, that I am too well persuaded of your candor, to attribute your refusal to any other cause than an apprehension of inconveniences that may attend the appointment.
Side 326 - I suppose they cannot anywhere spare so great an army for the operations of the field. Were it possible for this circumstance to justify in your Excellency a determination to lend us your personal aid, it is evident from the universal voice, that the presence of their beloved Countryman, whose talents have so long been successfully employed, in establishing the freedom of kindred States, to whose person they have still flattered themselves they retained some right, and have ever looked up as their...
Side 453 - That the secretary for foreign affairs report a letter to His Most Christian Majesty, to be sent by the marquis de La Fayette.
Side 253 - The choice of a minister of war is postponed to the 1st of October. This was a manoeuvre of Samuel Adams and others from the north, fearing that, as I was in nomination, the choice would fall on me, who, having apostatized from the true New England faith by sometimes voting with the southern States, am not eligible.
Side 456 - Gibson's expeditions falling through, will greatly encourage the savages to fall on the country with double fury, or perhaps the British, from Detroit, to visit this post, which, instead of being in a tolerable state of defence, is in fact nothing but a heap of ruins.
Side 453 - Foreign Affairs further acquaint the Minister Plenipotentiary at the Court of Versailles, that he will conform to the intention of Congress by consulting with, and employing the assistance of the Marquis de Lafayette, in accelerating the supplies, which may be afforded by his Most Christian Majesty for the use of the United States.
Side 295 - But you cannot conceive how unhappy I have been to hear that Mr. Lund Washington went on board the enemy's vessels, and consented to give them provisions. This being done by the gentleman who, in some measure, represents you at your house, will certainly have a bad effect, and contrasts with spirited answers from some neighbours that have had their houses burnt accordingly. You will do what you think proper about it, my dear general ; but, as your friend, it was my duty confidentially to mention...

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