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PSYCHOLOGICAL
INQUIRIES:

IN A SERIES OF ESSAYS,

INTENDED To ILLUSTRATE

THE MUTUAL RELATIONS OF THE PHYSICAL ORGANIZATION
AND THE MENTAL FACULTIES.

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"tre perceptions of the sense are gross, but even in the senses there is a difference. Though harmony and properties are not objects of sense, yet the eye and the ears are organs which offer to the mind such materials, by means whereof she may apprehend both the one and the other. By experiments of sense we become acquainted with the lower faculties of the soul; and from them, whether by a gradual evolution or ascent, we arrive at the highest. Sense supplies images to memory. These become subjects for fancy to work on ; reason considers and judges of the imaginations, and these acts of reason become new objects to the understanding. ln this scale, each lower faculty is a step that leads to the one above it, and the uppermost naturally leads to the Deity, which is rather the object of intellectual knowledge than even of the discursive faculty, not to mention the sensitive. There runs a chain throughout the whole system of beings. In this chain one link drags another; the meanest things are connected with the highest. The calamity, therefore, is neither strange nor much to be complained of, if a low sensual reader shall, from mere love of the animal life, find himself drawn in, surprised, and betrayed into, some curiosity concerning the intellectual."

Sir is, A Chain of Philosophical Reflexions concerning the Virtues

of Tar-water, by Georoe Berkley, D.D., Lord Bishop of

Cloyne, s. 303.

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ADVERTISEMENT.

The subject of the present Volume, although replete with interest, and of much practical importance, is one as to which we have no means of obtaining such complete and definite knowledge as to admit of it being presented in the shape of a systematic treatise. Some points may be considered as established with a sufficient degree of certainty; there are others as to which opinions may reasonably differ; while there is still a greater number of others as to which we must be content to acknowledge that, with our limited capacities, we have no means of forming an opinion at all.

The method of dialogue seems to be especially adapted for inquiries of this description; and it is hoped that this will be considered as a sufficient apology for the form in which the following observations are submitted to the public.

B. C. B.

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