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ANALYSES OF VINEGAR - Continued.

Whiskey.
Whiskey.
Cider.
Whiskey.
Whiskey.
Cider.
Whiskey
Cider.
Cider.
Cider.
Wbiskey.
Whiskey.
Malt.
Malt.
Malt.
Whiskey.
Whiskey.
Whiskey
Cider.
Whiskey.
Whiskey.
Whiskey.
Cider.
Whiskey.
Whiskey
Whiskey.
Whiskey.
Cider,
Cider.
Whiskey
Glucose.
Cider.
Cider.
Malt.
Malt.
Cider.
Whiskey.
Whiskey.

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SUMMARY OF VINEGAR.

Number of samples analyzed, 148.
Number that proved to be cider vinegar, 18.
Number that were whiskey vinegars, 95.
Number that were malt vinegars, 5.
Number that were glucose vinegars, 3.

The remaining twenty-eight samples contained more or less cider vinegar, but the solids had been reduced below the standard of two per cent. by the addition of whiskey vinegars.

Glucose and malt vinegars are rarely found on the market. At the time investigation of vinegars was begun charges were freely made in the press that large quantities of vinegar made from mineral acids were being consumed by the public. Contrary to expectations the vinegars found in the Wisconsin markets were free from adulteration by mineral acids.

If has been a pernicious custom for many years by the trade to foist upon the innocent purchaser a cheap imitation for cider vinegar. Many of these imitation vinegars are made from stale beers and bottle washings, and would be immediately driven from the markets if their identity were not so skillfully concealed by the manufacturer, who, in turn, is abetted by the conscienceless store keeper.

CREAM OF TURTAR.

The high price of cream of tartar causes it to be very generally adulterated. Besides the usual adulterants of

tarch and terra alba, marble, alum and barium sulphates are used. Compounds of acid phosphates of lime, alum, sulphate of lime and starch are also put on the market and sold as cream of tartar, but at a much lower price. The following table shows the composition of cream of tartar as found in the Wisconsin market.

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ANALYSIS OF CREAM OF TARTAR.

Name of manufacturer.

Address.

Other ingredients.

Not known..
Not known..
De Land & Co.

Fairport, N. Y.
Ira Parmley.

Center.
Sherman Bros...

Chicago
Not known..
Not known..
Chapman, Smith & Co Chicago
Not known..
Not known..
Nou known..
Not known.
Jewett, Sherman & Co... Chicago
R. M. & Fisher.

Chicago
Not known.
Not known..
Not known.
J. S. Gould

Chicago
Not known...
Not known...
Not known..
E. B. Miller & Co.

Chicago
Sherman Bros

Chicago
Sprague, Warner & Co Chicago
Sherman Bros..

Chicago
J.J. Hogan & Co..

La Crosse..
Eau Claire Grocery Co... Eau Claire
Not known..
Not known....
Not known.
Sent by C. R. Beach. Whitewater

Cream of tartar, plaster paris.
Plaster paris, sand, tartaric acid.
Tartaric acid, plaster of paris.
Tartaric acid, acid phosphate of lime.
Cream of tartar, acid phosphate of lime.
Cream of tartar, acid phosphate of lime - starch.
Pure.
Pure
Cream of tartar, plaster paris, acid phosphate of lime.
Pure.
Tartaric acid, plaster paris.
Acid phosphate of lime.
Pure.
Tartaric acid, plaster paris.
Tartaric acid, plaster paris.
Tartaric acid, plaster paris, alum.
Plaster paris, acid phosphate of lime.
Cream of tartar, plaster paris, starch.
Alum, starch, tartaric acid.
Tartaric acid, plaster paris, starch.
Tartaric acid, plaster paris.
Pure.
Tartaric acid, plaster paris, acid phosphate of lime, starch.
Plaster paris, acid phosphate of lime, starch, alum.
Pure.
Tartaric acid, plaster paris, acid phosphate of lime, starch.
Tartaric acid, plaster paris.
Pure.
Pure.
Tartaric acid, plaster paris.
Tartaric acid, starch.
Pure.
Phosphate, sulphate, starch.
Phosphate, sulphate, starch.
Phosphate, sulphate, starch.
Pure.
Pure.
Phosphate, starch.
Pure.

Jewett, Sherman & Co... Milwaukee..
Not known..
C. Pfizer.

New York

SUMMARY OF CREAM OF TARTAR.

Of the thirty-nine samples, but ten were found to be pure. Since baking powders have become so extensively used comparatively little cream of tartar is employed by the housewife. It enters more largely into the composition of medicines, and therefore the more important that it should be pure so that the desired effect be brought about. Even public health is not of enough importance to restrain unprincipled manufacturers from plying their nefarious prac tice for gain.

By consulting the above table the reader can determine at once the firms that handle adulterated stuffs.

The table needs no explanation except that tartaric acid and starch are not injurious. Every one knows how indigestible is sand, lime and plaster paris.

SYRUPS.

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Syrups, molasses, golden syrup, etc, are terms used to denote a sweet syrup produced in the manufacture of sugar and containing a mixture of sugar, partly cane and partly fruit, together with certain salts and impurities. Before the manufacture of glucose had attained its present proportions, the term molasses was understood to mean the vicid, brown, uncrystallizable syrup which is drained from the moist sugar during its formation and from sugar moulds in the refinery. At the present time the term means a mixture of molasses and glucose or glucose alone.

. The manner in which glucose is made and the fact that, considered as a sugar it is different from that made from the sugar cane, has caused it to be looked on with suspicion by the public. The question is often asked whether artificial glucose contains injurious compounds arising from the chemicals used in its manufacture or produced from the starch itself. The question is best answered by a description of the methods used in the manufacture of the article. Corn is found to be the best material for the manufacture of glucose, owing to its cheapness and high percentage of starch. In Europe potatoes are used for the same reason.

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