The Saturday Magazine, Volum 19

Forside
John William Parker, 1841
 

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Side 72 - The sum is this. If man's convenience, health, Or safety interfere, his rights and claims Are paramount, and must extinguish theirs. Else they are all — the meanest things that are, As free to live, and to enjoy that life, As God was free to form them at the first, Who in his sovereign wisdom made them all.
Side 199 - Now to the sister hills-j- that skirt her plain, To lofty Harrow now, and now to where Majestic Windsor lifts his princely brow. In lovely contrast to this glorious view, Calmly magnificent, then will we turn To where the silver Thames first rural grows.
Side 137 - Thus every good his native wilds impart, Imprints the patriot passion on his heart; And e'en those ills, that round his mansion rise, Enhance the bliss his scanty fund supplies. Dear is that shed to which his soul conforms, And dear that hill which lifts him to the storms ; And as a child, when scaring sounds molest, Clings close and closer to the mother's breast, So the loud torrent, and the whirlwind's roar, But bind him to his native mountains more.
Side 14 - Nothing is more certain than that our manners, our civilization, and all the good things which are connected with manners and with civilization, have in this European world of ours depended for ages upon two principles, and were indeed the result of both combined: I mean the spirit of a gentleman and the spirit of religion.
Side 56 - Death is at all times solemn, but never so much so as at sea. A man dies on shore ; his body remains with his friends, and " the mourners go about the streets...
Side 114 - David's life and history, as written for us in those Psalms of his, I consider to be the truest emblem ever given of a man's moral progress and warfare here below. All earnest souls will ever discern in it the faithful struggle of an earnest human soul towards what is good and best.
Side 58 - Fulke Greville, servant to Queen Elizabeth, counsellor to King James, and friend to Sir Philip Sidney.
Side 190 - The dead are like the stars by day ; Withdrawn from mortal eye, But, not extinct, they hold their way In glory through the sky : Spirits from bondage thus set free Vanish amidst immensity, Where human thought, like human sight, Fails to pursue their trackless flight.
Side 93 - And the people went about, and gathered it, and ground it in mills, or beat it in a mortar, and baked it in pans, and made cakes of it : and the taste of it was as the taste of fresh oil. And when the dew fell upon the camp in the night, the manna fell upon it.
Side 114 - Faults ? The greatest of faults, I should say, is to be conscious of none. Readers of the Bible above all, one would think, might know better. Who is called there ' the man according to God's own heart'?

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