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CH. VI. Of Novels

VII. Of Blank Verse and Rhyme

144

VIII. Of the Structure of Verse

146

IX. Of Varieties of Verse

X. Of Poetic Pauses

150

XI. Of Pastoral and Descriptive Poetry

XII. Of Didactic and Lyric Poetry

153

Sect. II. Examples of English Lyrics

XIII. Of Epic Poetry

. 158

XIV. Of Dramatic Poetry

159

XV. Of Hymns, Elegy, &c.

161

XVI. Of the Sonnet

163

XVII. The Literary Merit and Style of the English Bible

XVIII. The Form of Bible Poetry

PART IV.

OF ORIGINAL COMPOSITION.

Chap. I. Selection of proper Subjects .

172

II. Narrative Essays

174

III. Descriptive Essays

IV. Descriptive Essays (continued)

V. Miscellaneous Essays

VI. Miscellaneous Essays (continued)

177

PART V.

HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE.

CHAP. I. Of different Languages .

180

II. Of the Primitive Languages of Europe .

181

III. Of the English Language

182

IV. of the early History of the English Language

184

V. The Effect on it of the Saxon Conquest

185

VI. The Effect on it of the Danish Conquest

187

VII. The Effect on it of the Norman Conquest

188

VIII. Or the Modern History of our Language

190

IX. The same Subject continued

X. Of Periodical Literature

XI The component Parts of the English Language

194

PART VI.

MODERN BRITISH LITERATURE.

CHAP. I. English Literature under the Tudors and the first Stuarts. 197

II. English Literature from the Restoration to the Reign of

George III.

III. English Literature of the present Age :

199

IV. English Novels and Romances

202

V. The Eaglish Periodical Press

203

VI. English Philosophers and Critics of the present century

BRITISH POETS.

Criticisms and Specimens.

VII SECT. I. Shakspeare

207

II. Milton

210

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PRELIMINARY OBSERVATIONS

THE OCCASION FOR THIS WORK. Long experience in teaching has convinced the compiler that Aone of the numerous works known to him on the subject of Rhetoric and Composition are sufficiently adapted to a large class of scholars, in academies and common schools, that need, and are susceptible of, instruction in this important branch of knowledge. He has been compelled, therefore, by a regard to the interests of the young, and to the interests of the community, to undertake the compilation of a work from the best sources, which, being the result of long experience, may not only aid teachers and scholars in this branch of education, but may render the pursuit of it more agreeable than any other treatise within his knowledge. One great objection to almost every treatise hith erto furnished to schools, is their dry, uninteresting, and even repulsive character in the view of the young; which, added to the dislike to efforts in composition which the young generally enter tain, render those works of comparatively little service. TIIE IMPORTANCE OF THIS BRANCH OF EDUCATION BEING MORE

EXTENSIVELY AND THOROUGHLY TAUGHT IN ACADEMIES AND COMMON SCHOOLS.

The compiler of the present work begs leave to express his conviction that the labors of teachers in all our schools are di. rected too exclusively to the securing of correct habits in speaking and reading the language; and that altogether too limited an amount of time and share of attention are employed in teaching the art of correctly WRITING the language. He believes that during several years of attendance at school, the time of the pupil could not be more profitably employed, during an hour or a half hour of each day, than in transcribing from books, or in composing, until the art is acquired of correctly committing to paper what may be heard or thought. To do this, implies a practical and thorough knowledge of orthography, punctuation, and proper use of capital letters, in addition to a knowledge of grammatical and rhetorical principles.

When we consider how many, who have enjoyed the advantages of common and even of academic schools, are unable to write down their own thoughts or the speeches of other persons; how much occasion every one has in life for the ability to com municate or preserve his thoughts by writing ; when we consider how many persons of strong powers of reflection make no record of their valuable thoughts because they were not educated to the practice of it at school; when we consider, also, how difficult and protracted the process must be of learning to reduce our

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