The Principles of Population and Production as They are Affected by the Progress of Society: With a View to Moral and Politicial Consequences

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Baldwin, Cradock and Joy, 1816 - 493 sider

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Side 405 - It is good for a man not to touch a woman. Nevertheless, to avoid fornication, let every man have his own wife, and let every woman have her own husband.
Side 454 - In the Name of the Most Holy and Indivisible Trinity Their Majesties, the emperor of Austria, the king of Prussia, and the emperor of Russia...
Side 463 - Therefore, since custom is the principal magistrate of man's life, let men by all means endeavour to obtain good customs. Certainly custom is most perfect when it beginneth in young years : this we call education, which is in effect but an early custom.
Side 408 - And, ye fathers, provoke not your children to wrath: but bring them up in the nurture and admonition of the Lord.
Side 13 - In two centuries the population would be to the means of subsistence as 256 to 9; in three centuries as 4,096 to 13, and in two thousand years the difference would be almost incalculable.
Side 34 - were made for labour; one of them can carry, or haul, as much as two men can do. They also pitch our tents, make and mend our clothing, keep us warm at night; and, in fact, there is no such thing as travelling any considerable distance, or for any length of time, in this country, without their assistance.
Side 12 - In the first twenty-five years the population would be twenty-two millions, and the food being also doubled, the means of subsistence would be equal to this increase. In the next twenty-five years, the population would be forty-four millions, and the means of subsistence only equal to the support of thirty-three millions. In the next period the population would be eighty-eight millions, and the means of subsistence just equal to the support of half that number.
Side 5 - ... poor, of the great body of the people, seems to be the happiest and the most comfortable. It is hard in the stationary, and miserable in the declining state. The progressive state is in reality the cheerful and the hearty state to all the different orders of the society. The stationary is dull; the declining melancholy.
Side 392 - Collections relative to Systematic Relief of the Poor at different Periods, and in different Countries, with Observations on Charity, its proper Objects and Conduct, and its Influence on the Welfare of Nations. 8vo.
Side 456 - All the Powers who shall choose solemnly to avow the sacred principles which have dictated the present Act, and shall acknowledge how important it is for the happiness of nations, too long agitated, that these truths should henceforth exercise over the destinies of mankind all the influence which belongs to them, will be received with equal ardour and affection into this Holy Alliance.

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