Sporting Magazine, Volum 2

Forside
Rogerson & Tuxford, 1793
 

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Side 163 - I cannot eat but little meat, My stomach is not good ; But sure I think, that I can drink With him that wears a hood...
Side 163 - I stuff my skin so full within Of jolly good ale and old. Back and side go bare, go bare ; Both foot and hand go cold ; But, belly, God send thee good ale enough, Whether it be new or old.
Side 237 - This last supplied him with red deer, sea and river fish; and indeed all his neighbours' grounds and royalties were free to him, who bestowed all his time in such sports, but what he borrowed to caress his neighbours' wives and daughters, there being not a woman in all his walks of the degree of a yeoman's wife or under, and under the age of forty, but it was extremely her fault if he were not intimately acquainted with her.
Side 112 - WHEN a man hath taken a wife, and married her, and it come to pass that she find no favour in his eyes, because he hath found some uncleanness in her : then let him write her a bill of divorcement, and give it in her hand, and send her out of his house.
Side 311 - The aperture of the den on the east side of a very high ledge of rocks is about two feet square.
Side 163 - Now let them drink till they nod and wink, Even as good fellows should do; They shall not miss to have the bliss Good ale doth bring men to ; And all poor souls that have...
Side 238 - ... and huntsmen's poles in abundance. The parlour was a large long room, as properly furnished ; on a great hearth paved with brick lay some terriers and the choicest hounds and spaniels ; seldom but two of the great chairs had litters of young cats in them, which were not to be disturbed, he having always three or four attending him at dinner, and a little white round stick...
Side 238 - On the tables were hawks' hoods, bells, and such like ; two or three old green hats, with their crowns thrust in so as to hold ten or a dozen eggs, which were of a pheasant kind of poultry he took much care of and fed himself.
Side 41 - ... wax lights, and waiters attendant on his call, he would walk out about four in the morning, not towards home, but into Smithfield ! to meet his own cattle, which were coming to market from Thaydon-hall, a farm of his in Essex.
Side 308 - Inquisitive, nor leaves one turf untried, Till, conscious of the recent stains, his heart Beats quick; his snuffling nose, his active tail, Attest his joy ; then with deep opening mouth, That makes the welkin tremble, he proclaims Th' audacious felon ; foot by foot he marks His winding way, while all the listening crowd Applaud his reasonings.

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