Poems, Volum 1

Forside
Ticknor, Reed, and Fields, 1854
 

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Innhold

I
1
II
3
III
5
IV
8
V
13
VI
15
VII
18
VIII
19
XXIX
90
XXX
101
XXXI
104
XXXII
117
XXXIII
120
XXXIV
121
XXXV
137
XXXVI
141

IX
20
XI
28
XII
34
XIII
36
XIV
40
XV
42
XVI
46
XVII
48
XVIII
51
XIX
54
XX
55
XXII
60
XXIII
61
XXIV
63
XXV
66
XXVI
69
XXVII
78
XXVIII
83
XXXVII
154
XXXVIII
163
XXXIX
182
XL
186
XLI
188
XLII
191
XLIII
196
XLIV
198
XLV
200
XLVI
205
XLVII
209
XLVIII
211
XLIX
224
L
236
LI
243
LII
247
LIII
252

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Populære avsnitt

Side 211 - If thou shouldst never see my face again, Pray for my soul. More things are wrought by prayer Than this world dreams of. Wherefore, let thy voice Rise like a fountain for me night and day.
Side 206 - What is it thou hast seen? or what hast heard?' And answer made the bold Sir Bedivere: 'I heard the ripple washing in the reeds, And the wild water lapping on the crag.
Side 212 - So said he, and the barge with oar and sail Moved from the brink, like some full-breasted swan That, fluting a wild carol ere her death, Ruffles her pure cold plume, and takes the flood With swarthy webs. Long stood Sir Bedivere Revolving many memories, till the hull Look'd one black dot against the verge of dawn, And on the mere the wailing died away.
Side 146 - There is sweet music here that softer falls Than petals from blown roses on the grass, Or night-dews on still waters between walls Of shadowy granite, in a gleaming pass; Music that gentlier on the spirit lies, Than tired eyelids upon tired eyes; Music that brings sweet sleep down from the blissful skies. Here are cool mosses deep, And thro...
Side 208 - My wound hath taken cold, and I shall die." So saying, from the pavement he half rose, Slowly, with pain, reclining on his arm, And looking wistfully with wide blue eyes As in a picture. Him Sir Bedivere Remorsefully regarded thro...
Side 67 - ON either side the river lie Long fields of barley and of rye, That clothe the wold and meet the sky ; And thro' the field the road runs by To many-tower'd Camelot ; And up and down the people go, Gazing where the lilies blow Round an island there below, The island of Shalott. Willows whiten, aspens quiver, Little breezes dusk and shiver Thro...
Side 179 - em away. Old year, you must not go; So long as you have been with us, Such joy as you have seen with us, Old year, you shall not go.
Side 210 - So like a shatter'd column lay the King; Not like that Arthur who, with lance in rest, From spur to plume a star of tournament, Shot thro' the lists at Camelot, and charged Before the eyes of ladies and of kings.
Side 35 - Over its grave i' the earth so chilly ; Heavily hangs the hollyhock, Heavily hangs the tiger-lily. ii The air is damp, and hush'd, and close, As a sick man's room when he taketh repose An hour before death ; My very heart faints and my whole soul grieves At the moist rich smell of the rotting leaves, And the breath Of the fading edges of box beneath, And the year's last rose. Heavily hangs the broad...
Side 9 - Her tears fell with the dews at even; Her tears fell ere the dews were dried; She could not look on the sweet heaven, Either at morn or eventide. After the flitting of the bats, When thickest dark did trance the sky, She drew her casement-curtain by, And glanced athwart the glooming flats. 20 She only said, 'The night is dreary, He cometh not,' she said; She said, 'I am aweary, aweary, I would that I were dead!

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