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THE TWO EMPIRES OF IMMANUEL AND DIABOLUS;
WITH SOME ACCOUNT OF THEIR VARIOUS COUNTRIES, CUSTOMS, RACES,

AND RELIGIONS.

BY THE REV. KENNETH MOODY-STUART, M.A., MOFFAT.

II. THE COUNTRY OF PEACE.

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HIS country is a very extensive Often their first question is, 'Sir, what

territory within the Empire of must I do to be saved?’s The question is Immanuel. The name, ‘The asked with eager eyes and beating heart, and Land of Peace,' is indeed the words were probably learned from some sometimes applied to the whole of Immanuel's servants who were travelling of the dominions of this Prince, on some business of their Prince through the while at other times it is con- Land of Carnal Security. On one occasion a fined to that portion of them great crowd of three thousand fugitives came

which lies directly opposite to to the frontier, and called to the King's the Land of Carnal Security. It is in this officers, “Men and brethren, what shall we more limited sense that we now use the title. do?'ll and being most readily admitted by Like the land already described, this country him who was then stationed at the gate with comprises men of various races and languages, the keys of the kingdom, they were able in a but after they have been settled in the land few days not only to understand his speech, and become naturalised subjects, they all but themselves to join with him in publicly use the language of Canaan.* This language thanking and praising Immanuel for His is difficult at first for strangers and foreigners, clemency and royal grace. T but it is a beautiful speech, and very expres

One who was a trusted servant of Diabolus, sive. It is the language of the Court. All and was travelling with his commission to petitions to the Prince must be framed in it, arrest and imprison any suspected fugitives and a Great Teacher has been appointed under from his rule, was encountered by Immanuel the royal seal of Immanuel to instruct all Himself on the public highway in the country newly-arrived emigrants. His royal procla- of Belial, and was so astonished at His glorimation is in these terms, 'I will turn to the ous appearance that he fell to the earth, and people a pure language, that they may all call cried, “Lord, what wilt Thou have me to upon the name of the Lord, to serve Him do?'** and in a very few days, so rapid was with one consent.'+

his progress, he was able to preach in the When the emigrants first arrive at the fron- synagogues of the country, and to give his tier, they are, partly from fear, and partly from emphatic testimony on behalf of Immanuel, fatigue, often unable to articulate at all, and whose from that day he was, and whom hencecannot even so much as sue for admittance forth he served. from the sentinels set over the frontier for- Another petition commonly presented by tresses. But when these encounter any one immigrants is, 'God be merciful to me, a who appears unmistakably to be a fugitive sinner;'++ while others, finding great difficulty from Belial's territory, and who can only beg in taking the pure language of this country admittance by his tears, or by groans which into their polluted lips--for all the lips of the cannot be uttered, their orders are to admit subjects of Diabolus are affected with a kind him at once, and usher him into the presence of leprosy, which is indeed constitutional and of the Great Teacher, who can interpret through their whole system II-come with the the desires of his heart, and can afterwards cry, “Lord, teach us to pray!' or 'O Lord, enable the suppliant to clothe his wishes in suitable words. I

& Acts xvi. 30.

** Acts ix. 6, 20. Is. xix. 18.

- Zeph, iii. 9.
| Acts ii. 37.

tt Luke xviii. 13. Rom, viii. 26, 27,

I Acts ii. 41, 47.

!! Is. vi. 5.

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open Thou my lips !'* Now, the Great him that is far off, and to him that is near, Teacher uses several means to make them saith the Lord.'*** This sentence of welcome, acquire the pure speech of Immanuel's Land. although engraved in large letters of gold in He first touches their lips with a red-hot coal, the stone slab, the poor ignorant fugitives taken with the tongs from the altar on Cal- cannot decipher until they have been invary, for, though it is long since that fire was structed by the Great Teacher. In conselighted, it is still burning. With this He cau- quence of the dissemination of good education terises the leprous spots, and burns away the under the immediate superintendence of this proud flesh, and the blood of that sacrifice Great Teacher, I found on inquiry, and from that still impregnates the burning ashes has a examining them, that all the children born wonderful virtue for healing wounds.t He within the city are in their earliest years well also applies a healing ointment, called the taught, and they appeared very contented and Balm of Gilead, to the raw lips. I He then happy.ttt touches their tongue, using the word Eph- In the schools the first lesson - book is phatha, which means, Be opened, on which called the Law-book. The first edition of the string of the tongue is loosed, for you this book was written very long ago by a very must know that the impediment in the speech able Teacher named Moses, and it was written of these people arises very generally from upon two slabs of stone cut out of Mount their being tongue-tied; § and after this has Sinai. These stone slabs were broken, and been done, the tongue of the stammerers is others which supplied their place, and on ready to speak plainly.l. He next bids them which the same lessons were written by the take words, and turn to the Lord, and makes finger of Immanuel Himself, were in process them repeat after him this short sentence, of time lost; but copies of these Law-lessons • Take away all iniquity, and receive us gra- are in all the printed primers of the public ciously;'s and when they can repeat that, and private schools in this city and country. and have learned the meaning of it, he pours This lowest standard is taught to the beginthe oil of grace upon their lips,** which enables ners, and is the A B C of the instruction they them to pray to Immanuel, and to praise Him receive; but when they pass from this into to their heart's content, and to speak of His the higher classes, they are not allowed to glory and His love to others, for He gives forget what they have first learned, but are them all this injunction, 'Let your speech be trained to have it continually in their mind. alway with grace, seasoned with salt, that ye Such is the skill of the Great Teacher that He may know how ye ought to answer every succeeds in making pupils who have the worst man.'tt Henceforth their lips are dedicated memories remember these lessons. Even while to their Lord's service; their prayers and I was present one of the assistants came to praises are offerings as acceptable to Him as this Head Teacher to consult Him about some were the sacrifices of calves on the Jewish pupils whom he could not get to remember altars,It and such sacrifices they can present the Commandments. He at once said, Bring at all times and places : they no longer say, them to Me, and I will put My laws into their "Our lips are our own;' but whatsoever they mind, and write them in their hearts. III He do in word, as well as in deed, they do all in seemed to use no force, but to speak gently, the name of the Lord Jesus.$$

though with great dignity and authority, and Before giving any further account of this by a secret power of His own He not only at country of Peace, it may be well to give a once taught them some of these Law-lessons, brief description of the chief frontier town, but He put them in a way of mastering all the to whose friendly gates the fugitive emigrants rest. This I noticed, that He never overburfor the most part betake themselves. It is dened them with too long a lesson at a time, named the City of Refuge.III Over its prin- but that His plan was to give them line upon cipal portal stands the name of its founder, line, line upon line, precept upon precept,

Jehovah-shalom, If which by interpretation precept upon precept, here a little and there a is, 'The Lord will give thee peace;' and be little.SSS I was given also to understand that neath runs the inscription, 'Peace, peace to it was found necessary that every pupil in the

schools should at one time or other pass under * Luke xi. 1; Ps. li. 15. ** Ps. xlv. 2.

the tuition of the Head Teacher personally, + Is. vi. 7. 17 Col. iv. 6.

so that all the children were thus taught by Jer. viii. 22. 11 Hosea xiv. 2; Heb. xii. 15. $ Mark vii. 34.

$8 Ps. xii. 4; Col. iii. 17. 1 Is. xxxii. 4. | Ps. xlvi. 1; Num. xxxv. 6.

*** Is. lvii, 19.

*11 Heb. viii. 10. Hosea xiv. 2. 19 Judges vi. 24.

ttt Is. liv. 13.

889 Is. xxviii. 10.

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the Lord Himself. It must not be imagined leprosy that was epidemic in the country they that the class for beginners is composed en- came from, which went through the whole tirely of very young children. On the con- body, and affected the eyes as well as the lips trary, here I saw a little girl and her mother and tongue, and partly arose from their living poring over the same lesson, while in another so much in the dark forests of Diabolus' kingroom I observed an old silver-haired man dom, where at midday it is often as dark as sitting on the bench beside his grandson, and night, being indeed a land where darkness teaching the boy the lesson which he himself covers the earth, and gross darkness the had just with difficulty learned to spell people, and also from the poisonous sulphurthrough. Being curious to know what the ous dust that rises out of the mouth of the lesson was, especially as there was an expres- pit upon Mount Sinai. This blindness is not sion of deep anxiety on the old man's face, only common, but it is very difficult to cure; and I saw a tear fall now and again from the but I learned that the Great Physician had an boy's eyes, although he had begun to learn eye-salve|| which has just as wonderful virtue with a laughing countenance, I leaned over for restoring the eyesight as his Balm of them, and saw that the lesson, which was Gilead has for healing the leprosy of the lips printed very plainly in large type, ran thus:- and tongue. What strikes the traveller as Thou shalt not kill': 'Thou shalt not com- remarkable is that usually the scholars have mit adultery': “Thou shalt not steal': ‘Lie much more difficulty at first in learning to not one to another’: "The soul that sinneth, read and understand the gospel lessons than it shall die': “The wages of sin is death': the law lessons. Yet the type in which the 'One jot or tittle shall in no wise pass from gospel lessons are printed is no smaller than the law.'*

the type used in printing the law. Indeed, The windows in this Class-Room for Begin- one of the King's printers long ago got a ners look right across to Mount Sinai, with special injunction to print these lessons very its pillar of smoke by day, and of fire by large, so that he might run who read them, s night; and, as they face the north, the rooms and this large type has been used by many of look cold and cheerless, for the beams of the the printers who have succeeded him. The Light of the World, which have healing in key to this enigma seems to be, that even in their wings, never stream through the win their old country they had a certain knowdows. Also from the windows may be seen ledge of the Law, partly handed down from the great gloomy prisons which are being their fathers, who had heard the Law given built by the judges in Immanuel's Land for on Sinai, and partly derived from the sermons those who may continue to the end in their of the Great Preachers whom Immanuel has impenitence, rebellion, and crime.

sent, and especially of one Mr Conscience, After the scholars have learned this lesson- who was commissioned to remain in the land, book of the Law, one of the masters brings and to itinerate through it, and who has a them to the Higher School, which is the wonderful power of making them hear the School of the Gospel; for the Law is their Law, and from time to time to tremble under schoolmaster to bring them to Christ.t This it, even in the country of Carnal Security, Upper or High School is situated on the though, alas! he has not the power of making other side of the square, and the windows of them obey it. But, with regard to acquiring its class-rooms look towards the south, and a knowledge of the gospel, they had no such are bright with the shining of the Sun of advantages, for of this Mr Conscience knew Righteousness. I Indeed, the sunlight is so nothing, not even a syllable; and though brilliant that it is apt at first to dazzle the some of the other Prophets and Preachers eyes of the scholars, and make the letters knew it, they always told them that they dance before them on the page, so that the could only learn and receive it by leaving the glass of some of the windows is frosted, espe- land of their nativity, and coming to the cially in the junior class-rooms, to moderate school of Immanuel's Great Teacher; so that the light. And here I observed for the first all that they announced to them of the gospel time that many of the scholars seemed to was in the way of promise of good and desirsuffer from various diseases of the eye, and I able things, which they would get if they was told that this was caused partly by the

came and sued for them at the frontier of

Immanuel; and, as the poor deluded people * Exod. xx. 13-16; Ezek. xviii. 4; Rom. vi. 23; Matt. v. 18.

$ Is. Ix. 2.

| Rev. ii. 18. + Gal. iii. 24. Mal iv. 2.

1 Hab. ii. 2.

could not see these blessings which were so being given to superstition, burnt incense bedistant from them, the words conveyed to fore it. So, when a good and reforming king, them little or no meaning: for the things of named Hezekiah, saw how they were being the Spirit of God are foolishness to the na- misled by undue veneration for it, he broke it tural man, neither can he know them, because into fragments, which are all that can now be they are spiritually discerned.* Thus the seen. I A small ticket is attached to these gospel lessons are so wholly new to them that fragments, and on it are printed the words, we need not wonder if they often find it very written in Immanuel's own hand, “ As Moses far from easy to learn them. Some of the lifted up the serpent in the Wilderness, even learners, however, are much quicker than so has the Son of Man been lifted up, that others, and a few seem able to read the whosoever believeth in Him should not perish, first standard book, or at least its opening but have eternal life.' ** And I heard the pages, almost at once. If the services of the Head Teacher explaining to the scholars that Great Teacher Himself were needful in the Immanuel was once made a curse for them, other school, they are much more needful even like the serpent, which is a symbol of here. He not only requires thoroughly to the curse; and that, when He was hanged heal the eyesight, as well as loose the string upon the Cross, to which he pointed out of of the tongue, but He has to give understand the window, He redeemed them from the ing to the simple, educating their minds to curse of His Father's broken law, as it was understand the Scripture,t which is the name written, ‘Cursed is every one that hangeth on for the large volume containing all the lessons a tree.'tt So I understood why there was no used in both the schools. He makes large use need of Moses' serpent and pole being preof pictures and object-lessons in teaching. For served any longer, since the wounded now (for one thing, the windows looking towards the fiery serpents still breed in large numbers in south country give the scholars a clear view the jungle-country of Carnal Security, and of Mount Calvary with its cross and altar. bite the people with their poisonous fangs) One of the windows looks right out upon an can gaze on Immanuel's Cross, from which open sepulchre, the stone being rolled away flows healing virtue. from its mouth, and inside they can see the In this museum also is a golden pot filled linen clothes lying, and the napkin that had with a kind of white flour, called manna, on bound the bleeding brow of the murdered which Immanuel's people were fed for forty Prince who was buried there, lying carefully years while journeying through a great desert. wrapped together in a place by itself. I It has a glistening colour, like hoar frost, and

In this school also is a museum filled with is in round grains like coriander seed, and its rare and curious objects, many of them of taste is sweet, as if it were baked with honey. It great antiquity. Here may be seen Aaron's What fell from heaven in the Wilderness rod, that budded and brought forth almonds, would not keep over a single night, but bred and a golden chest with two cherubims made worms and putrified, except what fell on the of gold upon the top of it, and the golden Friday, which kept quite good over the next plate out of which they seem to rise has red day, which was their Sabbath, so that they stains of blood on it. Here also is a golden did not need to weary themselves with gathercandlestick of fine workmanship with seven ing it on their day of rest and worship.s$ Now branches, which has had a strange history. it seemed strange that, seeing this food was so And among other things are a number of perishable, this potful of it should have kept pieces of ancient brass; and when I asked fresh for thousands of years, with all their what these were, my guide told me that they changes of hot and cold seasons. But my were the fragments of a serpent of brass that guide told me that Immanuel had put some. was made by Moses in the Wilderness, which, thing into this manna to make it keep, and by divine appointment, he hung upon a pole that it was also possessed of many other wonamong the serpent-bitten Israelites; and it derful properties, so that in many respects it came to pass that, if a serpent had bitten any was superior to the manna of Moses. For man, when he beheld the serpent of brass he instance, it has the property of never going lived. || This brass snake was preserved care done, however many people partake of it, and fully for seven hundred years, and the people, on this account, as well as on that already ex

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* 1 Cor. ii. 14.

John xx. 6, 7. † Luke xxiv. 45. Š Heb. ix. 4, 5.

| Num. xxi. 8, 9.

2 Kings xviii. 4. ++ Gal. iii, 13.
John iï. 14, 15. 1 Exod. xvi. 14, 31.

88 Exod. xvi. 23, 24.

plained, it is commonly called 'living bread,' sought, and this on several accounts. First, or the bread of life.'* Immanuel keeps the because it is one of the rules of Immanuel in key of this never-failing store of bread, and dispensing the bread to fill the hungry with dispenses it, either personally or through His good things, and to send the rich empty officers, to the scholars in the school, and to away. ** He says that this bread from heaven all the people who come to settle in His terri- | is His Father's gift to the hungry,tt and that tory, and it is said that He can so multiply He is empowered to give it freely, but not to this bread as to make it feed the whole world. I sell it. One of His servants, when he took

On one occasion He fed with it 4000 people, out the golden casket to dispense it to the and on another 5000, besides women and people, used to say, “Wherefore do ye spend children ; and when their meal was ended, money for that which is not bread ? He that there was more of the living bread than be- hath no money, come ye, buy and eat.' It Anfore they began to eat. I So, often since, both other reason why these rich traders are sent in the times of His apostles (for so He called away is, that they send their clerks and confiHis chosen friends), and under the ministry dential friends to treat for it, and will not conof well-known servants of His whom He has sent first to come for it themselves, and then to sent from time to time to feed the famishing settle in Immanuel's country, instead of refugitives from Diabolus' kingdom (for in their turning to their old homes. Now Immanuel's flight they get no food, and the swine's husks, proclamation is, 'He that cometh to Me shall which they can gather abundantly in the fields, never hunger ;' and 'He that eateth My flesh no longer appease their cravings), thousands dwelleth in Me, and I in him.'s! From these have partaken of this food at once. But per- terms He has always refused to make any haps the most extraordinary thing is that abatement. those who partake of this food from heaven When I had thus had the meaning of the never hunger again, and never die.ll Im- golden pot and its contents explained to me, manuel has written this legend on the rim of the school bell was rung, and the boys and girls the golden bowl, “ He that eateth of this bread trooped out to play in the streets of the City shall live for ever.'T The virtues of this bread of Refuge,.||| and the officer of Immanuel then have, as you may suppose, spread far and wide, in charge took out the Bread of Life to the and some of the rich men in Diabolus' king- market-place, to give it to the hungry new dom have sent to purchase a portion of it, and arrivals. And what more I saw in the Country offered to pay large sums of money for it. of Peace I must defer telling till a future time. But they have never received what they

(To be continued.)

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BY GEORGE P. FISHER, D.D., LL.D., YALE COLLEGE, CONNECTICUT.

THE FOURTH GOSPEL THE WORK OF THE APOSTLE JOHN.

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USEBIUS places the Gospel of their part, to the Gospel seem to have been
John in the catalogue of the an after-thought, due to an antagonism which

Homologoumena '- books re- had its origin in a purely subjective and dog-
ceived without dispute by all matic prejudice. Since they discarded the
Christian people. Its author- Apocalypse as well as the Gospel, and absurdly

ship had never been questioned, ascribed them both to Cerinthus, a contemexcept in the solitary instance of an insignifi- porary of John, their protest, as Zeller allows, cant sect which Epiphanius terms 'Alogi ;' affords no indication that any other tradition for there is no reason to doubt that these as to the authorship of the Gospel existed save persons, who lived at Thyatira in Lydia, are that accepted by the Church. No importance, the same to whom Irenæus refers ; who are then, attaches to the dissent of this obscure noticed, also, later by Philastrius, and against party, on which Irenæus thinks it necessary to whom, 'not improbably, Hippolytus wrote. bestow but a few lines. The ancient church They were carried in their opposition to is united in its testimony to the genuineness Montanism, with its doctrine of prophetical of the Fourth Gospel; and whoever adopts gifts and of the Paraclete, into an antipathy the contrary opinion is bound to account for to both the Apocalypse and the Gospel; and this consentaneous judgment of antiquity. their tendencies of thought sooner or later The modern attack on the Johannine awakened in them a repugnance to the con- authorship, as far as it merits serious attenception of the Logos or of the pre-existence tion, may be said to have begun with the first of Christ as a person.

Critical objections, on essay in which Baur took up the subject. It

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