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Φιλοσοφίαν δε ου την Στωικήν λέγω, ουδε την Πλατωνικήν ή την 'Επικου-
ρείον τε και Αριστοτελικήν· αλλ' όσα είρηται παρ' εκάστη των αιρέσεων τούτων
καλώς, δικαιοσύνης μετά ευσεβούς επιστήμης εκδιδάσκοντα, τούτο σύμπαν το
'ΕΚΛΕΚΤΙΚΟΝ φιλοσοφίαν φημί.– CLEM. AL.EX. Strom. L. Ι.- c. vii. ED. PoTT.
VEx. 1757, p. 338, L. ΙΙ.

NEW SERIES.

VOL. X.

LONDON:

WARD AND CO., 27, PATERNOSTER ROW.

w. OLIPHANT AND SON, EDINBURGH :

R. STARK, GLASGOW;

G. AND R. KING, ABERDEEN; AND J. ROBERTSON, DUBLIN.

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THE

Eclectic Review. .

JULY, 1855.

ART. I.–Catalogus codicum MSS. orientalium qui in Museo Bri

tannico asservantur. Pars I., codices Syriacos et Carshunicos amplectens. (Catalogue of Oriental Manuscripts, which are preserved in the British Museum. Part I. including Codices

in Syriac and Carshun.] J. Forshall, Londini. 1838. 2. Catalogue of Additional MSS. in the British Museum. 1843, &c. 3. De la renaissance des Etudes Syriaques. Par M. Felix Nève.

[On the Revival of Syriac Studies. By M. Felix Nève.]

Paris. 1854. The subject of the Syriac language and literature is one of considerable magnitude, and of growing interest. The language, with slight modifications, probably asserts an antiquity which carries us to the plain of Shinar. It was, very likely, the native speech of Abraham, who came from Mesopotamia. But certainly we find traces of it in the thirty-first chapter of Genesis, where we read that a heap of stones, which Jacob called Galeed, was by Laban, the Syrian, designated Jegar-sahadutha. Now both names have one signification, the heap of witness,' only, one is Hebrew, and the other Aramaic. This Aramaic, as the Hebrews termed it, or the language of Aram, became divided into two great branches, called the eastern and the western; and these again were varied by dialectic differences. The eastern (or southern) division is generally known as the Chaldaic; while the western (or northern) is commonly called the Syriac. When this distinction originated is by no means certain. There is very much in the two languages which is similar, and they both, in many things, resemble the Hebrew, Arabic, Ethiopic, and other

N.S.-VOL. X.

B

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