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ing them, send unto thy companions.” “Heaven reward thee!” said Geraint; “ and this will I do.” And Geraint journeyed to the uttermost parts of his dominions. And experienced guides, and the chief men of his country, went with him. And the furthermost point that they showed him he kept possession of.

CHAPTER VII.

GERAINT, THE SON OF ERBIN, CONTINUED.

GERAINT, as he had been used to do when he was at Arthur's court, frequented tournaments. And he became acquainted with valiant and mighty men, until he had gained as much' fame there as he had formerly done elsewhere. And he enriched his court, and his companions, and his nobles, with the best horses and the best arms, and with the best and most valuable jewels, and he ceased not until his fame had flown over the face of the whole kingdom. When he knew that it was thus, he began to love ease and pleasure, for there was no one who was worth his opposing. And he loved his wife, and liked to continue in the palace, with minstrelsy and diversions. So he began to shut himself up in the chamber of his wife, and he took no delight in anything besides, insomuch that he gave up the friendship of his nobles, together with his hunting and his amusements, and lost the hearts of all the host in his court. And there was murmuring and scoffing concerning him among the inhabitants of the palace, on account of his relinquishing so completely their companionship for the love of his wife. These tidings came to Erbin. And when Erbin had heard these things, he spoke unto Enid, and inquired of her whether it was she that had caused Geraint to act thus, and to forsake his people and his hosts. “ Not I, by my confession unto Heaven,” said she ; " there is nothing more hateful unto me than this.” And she knew not what she should do, for, although it was hard for her to own this to Geraint, yet was it not more easy for her to listen to what she heard, without warning Geraint concerning it. And she was very sorrowful.

One morning in the summer-time they were upon their couch, and Geraint lay upon the edge of it. And Enid was without sleep in the apartment, which had windows of glass ; * and the sun shone upon

the couch. And the clothes had slipped from off his arms and his breast, and he was asleep. Then she gazed upon the marvellous beauty of his appearance, and she said, “ Alas! and am I the cause that these arms and this breast have lost their glory, and the warlike fame which they once so richly enjoyed !” As she said this the tears dropped from her eyes, and they fell upon his breast. And the tears she shed, and the words she had spoken, awoke him. And another thing contributed to awaken him, and that was the idea that it was not in thinking of him that she spoke thus, but that it was because she loved some other man more than him, and that she wished for other society. Thereupon Geraint was troubled in his mind, and he called his squire ; and when he came to him, “Go quickly,” said he, “and prepare my horse and my arms, and make them ready. And do thou arise,” said he to Enid, “and apparel thyself; and cause thy horse to be accoutred, and clothe thee in the worst riding-dress that thou hast in thy possession. And evil betide me," said he, “if thou returnest here until thou knowest whether I have lost my strength so completely as thou didst say. And if it be so, it will then be easy for thee to seek the society thou didst wish for of him of whom thou wast thinking." So she arose, and clothed herself in her meanest garments. know nothing, lord,” said she, “ of thy meaning.' “Neither wilt thou know at this time," said he.

* The terms of admiration in which the older writers invariably speak of glass windows would be sufficient proof, if other evidence were wanting, how rare an article of luxury they were in the houses of our ancestors. They were first introduced in ecclesiastical architecture, to which they were for a long time confined. Glass is said not to have been employed in domestic architecture before the fourteenth century.

Then Geraint went to see Erbin. “Sir," said he, “I am going upon a quest, and I am not certain when I may come back. Take heed, therefore, unto thy possessions until my return.” “I will do so,” said he ; “ but it is strange to me that thou shouldst go so suddenly. And who will proceed with thee, since thou art not strong enough to traverse the land of Loegyr alone ?

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person only will go with me.” “ Heaven counsel thee, my son,” said Erbin, “and may many attach themselves to thee in Loegyr.” Then went Geraint to the place where his horse was, and it was equipped with foreign armor, heavy and shining: And he desired Enid to mount her horse, and to ride forward, and to keep a long way before him. “ And whatever thou mayest see, and whatever thou mayest hear concerning me,” said he, “ do thou not turn back. And unless I speak unto thee, say not thou one word either.” So they set forward. And he did not choose the pleasantest and most frequented road, but that which was the wildest, and most beset by thieves and robbers and venomous animals.

And they came to a high-road, which they followed till they saw a vast forest; and they saw four armed horsemen come forth from the forest. When the armed men saw them, they said one to another, “Here is a good occasion for us to capture two horses and armor, and a lady likewise ; for this we shall have no difficulty in doing against yonder-single knight, who hangs his head so pensively and heavily.” Enid heard this discourse, and she knew not what she should do through fear of Geraint, who had told her to be silent. “The vengeance of Heaven be upon me,” said she, “ if I would not rather receive my death from his hand than from the hand of any other; and though he should slay me, yet will I speak to him, lest I should have the misery to witness his death.” So she waited for

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