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it loose.” “If thou wilt not loose it for this, I will give thee four and twenty pounds of ready money to set it free.” “I will not set it free, by Heaven, for as much again,” said he. 66 If thou wilt not set it free for this, I will give thee all the horses that thou seest in this plain, and the seven loads of baggage, and the seven horses that they are upon. By Heaven, I will not,” he replied.

66 Since for this thou wilt not set it free, do so at what price soever thou wilt.” “I will that Rhiannon and Pryderi be free,” said he. “That thou shalt have,he answered. “ Not yet will I loose the mouse, by Heaven." What then wouldst thou?" 66 That the charm and the illusion be removed from the seven cantrevs of Dyved.” “This shalt thou have also ; set therefore the mouse free.” 66 I will not set it free, by Heaven,” said he, “ till I know who the mouse may be.” “ She is my wife.” 66 Wherefore came she to me?” “To despoil thee,” he answered. “I am Lloyd, the son of Kilwed, and I cast the charm over the seven cantrevs of Dyved. And it was to avenge Gawl, the son of Clud, from the friendship I had towards him, that I cast the charm. And upon Pryderi did I avenge Gawl, the son of Clud, for the game of Badger in the Bag, that Pwyll, the son of Auwyn, played upon him. And when it was known that thou wast come to dwell in the land, my household came and besought me to transform them into mice, that they might destroy thy corn. And they went the first and the second night, and destroyed thy two crops. And the third night came unto me my wife and the ladies of the court, and besought me to transform them. And I transformed them. Now she is not in her usual health. And had she been in her usual health, thou wouldst not have been able to overtake her ; but since this has taken place, and she has been caught, I will restore to thee Pryderi and Rhiannon, and I will take the charm and illusion from off Dyved. Set her therefore free.” “I will not set her free yet.” " What wilt thou more ?” he asked. 66 I will that there be no more charm upon the seven cantrevs of Dyved, and that none shall be put upon it henceforth ; moreover, that vengeance be never taken for this, either upon Pryderi or Rhiannon, or upon me.” " All this shalt thou have. And truly thou hast done wisely in asking this. Upon thy head would have lit all this trouble.” “ Yea," said he, “ for fear thereof was it that I required this.” “Set now my wife at liberty." "I will not,” said he, “ until I see Pryderi and Rhiannon with me free.” hold, here they come,” he answered.

And thereupon behold Pryderi and Rhiannon. And he rose up to meet them, and greeted them, and sat down beside them. " Ah, chieftain, set now my wife at liberty,” said the bishop. “ Hast thou not received all thou didst ask?“I will release her, gladly,” said he.. And thereupon he set her free.

Then he struck her with a magic wand, and she

66 Be

was changed back into a young woman, the fairest ever seen.

“ Look round upon thy land,” said he," and thou wilt see it all tilled and peopled as it was in its best estate.” And he rose up and looked forth. And when he looked he saw all the lands tilled, and full of herds and dwellings.

And thus ends this portion of the Mabinogi.

The following allusions to the preceding story are found in a letter of the poet Southey to John Rickman, Esq., dated June 6th, 1802:

“ You will read the Mabinogeon, concerning which I ought to have talked to you. In the last, that most odd and Arabian-like story of the mouse, mention is made of a begging scholar, that helps to the date ; but where did the Cymri get the imagination that could produce such a tale? That enchantment of the basin hanging by the chain from heaven is in the wildest spirit of the Arabian Nights. I am perfectly astonished that such fictions should exist in Welsh. They throw no light on the origin of romance, everything being utterly dissimilar to what we mean by that term, but they do open a new world of fiction; and if the date of their language be fixed about the twelfth or thirteenth century, I cannot but think the mythological substance is of far earlier date; very probably brought from the East by some of the first settlers or conquerors.”

CHAPTER XI.

KILWICH AND OLWEN.

KILYDD, the son of Prince Kelyddon, desired a wife as a helpmate, and the wife that he chose was Goleudid, the daughter of Prince Anlawd. And after their union the people put up prayers that they might have an heir. And they had a son through the prayers of the people; and called his name Kilwich.

After this the boy's mother, Goleudid, the daughter of Prince Anlawd, fell sick. Then she called her husband to her, and said to him, “Of this sickness I shall die, and thou wilt take another wife. Now wives are the gift of the Lord, but it would be wrong for thee to harm thy son. Therefore I charge thee that thou take not a wife until thou see a briar with two blossoms upon my grave.” And this he promised her. Then she besought him to dress her grave every year, that no weeds might grow thereon. . So the queen died. Now the king sent an attendant every morning to see if anything were growing upon the grave. And at the end of the seventh year they neglected that which they had promised to the queen.

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