Sidebilder
PDF
ePub

the recording of cases, two dozen. (The Secretary of the

Charity Hospital will tell you where to get them). 145. Clinical Charts for recording temperatures, pulse, respira. tion, two dozen.

The vessels must not leave until these articles aie on board and so certified by a certificate from the Resident Medical Inspector and the Marine Medical Inspector, who is to be aboard. 146. The Secretary shall give to the Resident Inspector:

The notification of his appointment.
Copy of the Sanitary Code.

Copy of all regulations governing Fruit Vessels. 147. The Secretary shall give to the Marine Medical Inspector aboard:

The notification of his appointment.
Copy of the Sanitary Code.

Copy of all regulations governing Fruit Vessels. 148. The Secretary shall see that masters, agents, inspectors, Resident Quarantine Physicians and all concerned shall be provided with a copy of the regulations of the Board governing Fruit Vessels.

149. The Secretary shall see that the agents of fruit vessels sign an acquiescence to all these regulations.

150. He shall furnish masters with the blank forms for reports marked as Nos. 8 and ii in the regulations.

REGULATIONS GOVERNING INFECTED FRUIT VESSELS.

Should any vessel arrive with yellow fever on board, the officers and crew shall be removed to the shore. The holds and engine rooms shall be disinfected with Pyrethrum. The rest of the ship with sulphur. The ship shall be anchored in midstream. Its cargo shall then be unloaded on a barge by a crew sent from New Orleans. The barge, when loaded, shall be towed to New Orleans; the unloading crew shall be detained in Quarantine six days.

The vessel shall be refumigated when unloaded, reship her original crew and proceed to sea. W. S. INGRAM,

C. H. IRION, M. D..
Secretary.

President.

RESIDENT AND MARINE MEDICAL INSPECTORS.

For the quarantine season of 1906 the Physicians elected to serve as Resident Medical Inspectors of the Louisiana State Board of Health at fruit ports were:

Dr. King Holt, Bluefields, Nicaragua.
Dr. C. L. Mengis, Bocas del Toro, Colombia.
Dr. W. J. B. Tusson, Livingston, Guatemala.
Dr. A. R. Choppin, Port Limon, Costa Rica.
Dr. R. A. Mayer, Belize, British Honduras.
Dr. P. L. Cusachs, Port Barrios, Guatemala.
Dr. E. W. Neal, Ceiba, Spanish Honduras.
Dr. E. B. Pries, Port Cortez, Spanish Honduras.

(A little later Dr. W. L. Stone was chosen as the Resident Medical Inspector of the Louisiana Board at Havana, Cuba.)

The following physicians were also elected for assignment to duty as Marine Medical Inspectors on Fruit Vessels: Dr. F. C. Braud.

Dr. J. E. Heidingsfelder. Dr. W. L. Stone.

Dr. A. C. Leigh. Dr. R. E. Mayer.

Dr. L. A. Wailes. Dr. Alex. Maylie.

Dr. W. H. Pipes. Dr. Nagib Abdon.

Dr. A. H. Butler. Dr. Roland Thomas.

Dr. W. Wild.

QUARANTINE CONFERENCE IN NEW ORLEANS.

The annual conferencce to agree upon all the working details of Maritime Quarantine on the part of Louisiana, Texas and Alabama for the season of 1906 was to have met at Austin, Texas, but as Dr. Tabor, State Health Officer of Texas, had to pass through New Orleans, returning from Europe, it was arranged to hold the meeting in the latter city, as being more convenient of access to most of the delegates.

Accordingly, on March 27 the following Southern Health Officials met at the offices of the Louisiana State Board of Health in New Orleans:

Dr. C. H. Irion, President Louisiana State Board of Health.
Dr. W. G. Armstrong, Member Louisiana State Board of Health.
Dr. A. J. Perkins, Member Louisiana State Board of Health.
Dr. Geo. R. Tabor, State Health Officer of Texas.
Dr. W. R. P. Thompson, State Quarantine Officer of Texas.
Dr. Rhett Goode, President Quarantine Board of Mobile Bay.
Dr. Henry Goldthwaite, Executive Officer Board of Mobile Bay.
Dr. Jno. F. Hunter, Secretary Board of Health of Mississippi.

Those present agreed among themselves on the main points at issue, but as the control of Maritime Quarantine at ports of Florida and Mississippi was under the jurisdiction of the U. S. Treasury Department it was realized that no uniform system of regulation for the gulf ports could be put in force without the concurrence of Surgeon General Wyman of the U. S. Public Health and Marine Hospital Service. Therefore the following telegram, signed by all the delegates was sent to Dr. Wyman:

“We the undersigned, representatives of our several states, urgently request you to call a conference at New Orleans not

later than April 15th, to discuss Maritime Quarantine, in order ' that we may agree upon uniform regulations for gulf ports and

that you attend in person." Surgeon General Wyman ultimately called the conference, not at New Orleans but at Washington, and as will be presently related, the representatives of Louisiana and Texas did not at that time succeed in persuading him to make any change in the regulations which his bureau has adopted.

QUARANTINE CONFERENCE IN WASHINGTON, APRIL 16, 1906.

Prior to the yellow fever outbreak of 1905 the general rule in quarantine practice was to detain vessels and persons five days after the last possible exposure to infection, but as quite a number of accurately observed cases, about 13 per cent., had been found to exceed this time of incubation, the Louisiana Board in its regulation for 1906 fixed the time of detention for vessels from yellow fever ports at six days. Texas joined Louisiana in this requirement and both States included Cuba in the list of potentially infected localities.

In the Maritime Quarantine Regulations of the U. S. Treasury Department for 1906, which were in effect at the ports of Florida and Mississippi, no change had been made from the five days detention of former years, and no restriction was placed on travel from Cuba.

This difference in regulations not only placed New Orleans and Galveston commercially at a disadvantage, but by imposing no detention on passengers from Cuba, where there was good reason to suspect lurking infection, enabled persons leaving that island to land at Miami, Tampa, Pensacola or Gulfport and to reach Louisiana or Texas within three days. This was all the more remarkable as contrasted with the state of affairs in Porto Rico, an island exclusively under the jurisdiction of Federal authority, but which was practically quarantined against the whole of Cuca.

With the object of securing, if possible, uniformity in the quarantine regulations in force at the gulf ports of the United States, the Surgeon General of the U. S. P. H. & M. H. Service had been requested by the Southern Health Officials to call a quarantine conference in New Orleans and to be present at the same.

This conference was actually held in Washington April 16, 1906. Those participating were: Surgeon General Wyman and Surgeon Geddings of the U. S. P. H. & M. H. Service; Dr. C. H. Irion, President Louisiana State Board of Health ; Dr. Geo. R. Tabor, State Health Officer of Texas ; Dr. Henry Goldthwaite, Executive Officer, Quarantine Board of Mobile Bay and Dr. Jos. Y. Porter, Chief Quarantine Officer of Florida.

The representatives of Louisiana and Texas were united but unsuccessful in maintaining:

First: That the danger from Cuba was 'too great to warrant unrestricted travel from that island to the United States, especially in view of the very limited number of officers of the U. S. P. H. & M. H. Servicce on duty in Cuba.

Second: That at least forty days should elapse after the last case of fever at a port before that port can be considered safe.

Third: That six days' detention should be imposed on vessels and persons quarantined for protection against yellow fever.

Fourth: That all the ports of Mexico should be considered as suspected and regulations relative to disinfection of vessels at ports of departure be applied accordingly.

In the discussion of these topics the delegates from Alabama and Florida concurred with Surgeon General Wyman, who said he could see no reason to change the U. S. Treasury regulations relative to Cuba and fixing the detention of quarantined vessels at five days.

Dr. Goldthwaite thought twenty-one days sufficient for safety after the last case of yellow fever at a locality and was sustained by the majority.

As regards the ports of Mexico it was decided to regard them all as infected except Tampico.

Although unable to secure the desired modification of the U. S. Treasury Quarantine Rules, Louisiana and Texas adhered to their own regulations as originally adopted, and their unwillingness to accept the optimistic view of Surgeon General Wyman relative to health conditions in Cuba was fully justified by the report of a fatal case of yellow fever at Matanzas May 18th.

THE U. S. PUBLIC HEALTH AND MARINE HOSPITAL SERVICE

ADMITS NECESSITY FOR QUARANTINING AGAINST CUBA.

With the occurrence of a death from yellow fever at Matanzas che President of the Louisiana State Board of Health and the State Health Officer of Texas jointly telegraphed the Surgeon General of the U. S. Public Health and Marine Hospital Service as follows:

New ORLEANS, May 19th, 1906. Dr. Waiter Wyman, Surgeon General U. S. P. H. and M. H.

Service, Washington, D. C.: In view of the death from yellow fever at Matanzas and continued nepoits of dengue, pernicious and infectious fever and suspicious cases at Havana, we respectfully urge you in the name of the States we represent and for the protection of the people of the South, to quarantine Florida and Mississippi against the island of Cuba.

CLIFFORD H. IRION,
President Louisiana State Board of Health.

GEO. R. Tabor,
State Health Officer of Texas.

At the same time the following telegram was sent to Dr. W. H. Sanders, State Health Officer of Alabama; Dr. Jno. F. Hunter, Executive Officer Missisippi State Board of Health; and Dr. Rhett Goode, Executive Officer Quarantine Board of Mobile Bay:

NEW ORLEANS, May 19, 1906. (Separately addressed):

In view of the death from yellow fever at Matanzas and continued dengue and suspicious cases reported at Havana, Dr. Tabor and I telegraphed Wyman to-day urging him to apply quarantine against Cuba. We earnestly urge you to telegraph him the same.

CLIFFORD H. IRION,
President Louisiana State Board of Health.

Upon the receipt of the joint telegram sent on behalf of Louisiana and Texas the Surgeon General of the United States Public Health and Marine Service replied as follows:

« ForrigeFortsett »