The play-day book; or, New stories for little folks, by Fanny Fern. Author's ed

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Side 104 - Abide with me ; fast falls the even-tide ; The darkness deepens ; Lord, with me abide ; When other helpers fail, and comforts flee, Help of the helpless, O abide with me. Swift to its close ebbs out life's little day ; Earth's joys grow dim, its glories pass away : Change and decay in all around I see ; 0 Thou Who changest not, abide with me.
Side 164 - Temple of it ;" — that city from above, which hath " no need of the sun, neither of the moon to shine in it ; for the glory of God doth lighten it, and the Lamb is the light thereof.
Side 25 - THREE wise men of Gotham Went to sea in a bowl; If the bowl had been stronger, My song had been longer.
Side 71 - ... tops. 5. One day, as Andy was strolling across the track, he saw that there was something wrong about it. He did not know much about railroad tracks, because he was as yet quite a little lad, but the rails seemed to be wrong somehow, and Andy had heard of cars being thrown off by such things. 6. Just then he heard a low, distant noise. Dear, dear! the cars were coming then!
Side 18 - Well, that's nice ; let me get another card to wind that skein on, when I have done this. I hope it is a long story, I hope it is funny, I hope there ain't any 'moral' in it. Katy Smith's mother always puts a moral in. I don't like morals, do you, mother?" Susy's mother laughed, and said that she didn.t like them when she was her age. " There now — there — I'm ready, now begin. But don't say
Side 71 - Near his father's house there was a railroad track; and Andy often watched the black engine as it came puffing past, belching out great clouds of steam and smoke, and screeching through the valleys and under the hills like a mad thing. Although it went by the...
Side 71 - God bless the boy." And that is not all, they took out their purses and made up a large sum of money for him, not that they could ever repay the service he had done them, — they knew that, — but to show him in some way...
Side 71 - Andy never thought that he might be killed himself, but he went and stood straight in the middle of the track, just before the bad place on it that I have told you about, and stretched out his little arms as far apart as he could. On, on came the cars, louder and louder. The engineer saw the boy on the track, and whistled for him to get out of the way. Andy never moved a hair.
Side 72 - And that is not all, they took out their purses and made up a large sum of money for him, not that they could ever repay the service he had done them, — they knew that, — but to show him in some way besides in mere words that they felt grateful. 10. Now that boy had presence of mind. Good, brave little Andy! The passengers all wrote down his name — Andy Moore — and the place he lived in, and if you wish to know what was done for him, I will tell you. He was sent to school, and, in after years...
Side 197 - Eiug. 5. Which is the Liberal Man ? 6. How to make Friends. 7. Christmas ; or, The Good Fairy. 8. A Scene in Jerusalem. 9. Sketches from Life. 10. Fanny Grey ; or, Art & Nature. 11. The Two Altars. 12. The Old Meeting-house. In neat Packet, price One Shilling.

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