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The 9,982 patients under care were grouped as follows, according to the nature of their cases : Communicable Diseases — Tuberculosis

4,359 All others

117 Maternity – Prenatal

159 Postnatal

171 Infants under two years of age (except eye)

3,054 EyeInfants under two years of age..

30 All others

70 Other Diseases Medical

1,477 Surgical

507 Social Service

38

Total

*9,982

* Akron's 948 patients under care were listed as 382 infant welfare, 516 tuberculosis and 50 general nursing cases. This accounts for the difference between the two totals of patients.

BILL FOR FEDERAL AID OF
VENEREAL DISEASE WORK

To establish a government board of social hygiene and make permanent the present activities of the government for the control of venereal disease are objects of a bill introduced into Congress by Senator Chamberlain and Representative Kahn. The proposed board would consist of the surgeons-general of the Army, the Navy and the Public Health Service, and any other members whom these three might designate, with the secretaries of war, navy and treasury as ex officio members.

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DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS BY DIVISIONS

DIVISION OF COMMUNICABLE DISEASES

Reported Cases of Notifiable Diseases, June, 1918 Prevalence. In order of greatest prevalence for June, the notifiable diseases list as follows, with comparative figures for May given: Disease

Reported Cases

June May 1. Whooping cough

1,635 1,341 2. Measles

1,362 2,750 3. Gonorrhea

1,215 358 4. Smallpox

610 1,214 5. Tuberculosis

606 656 6. Mumps

522 966 7. Syphilis

386 147 8. Scarlet fever

357

701 9. Diphtheria

355 335 10. Chickenpox

272

633 11. Typhoid fever

168

122 12. Measles, German

164 1,660 13. Ophthalmia neonatorum

121 134 14. Pneumonia, Acute lobar.

77 238 15. Trachoma

56 22

For no other notifiable disease was a total of 50 or more cases recorded for June. Whooping cough, which was indicated to be on the increase in May, changing to third place in order of prevalence from fifth in April, is first in June. Measles, although ranking second as to prevalence, shows only half the number of reported cases for June as recorded for May. For German measles, only one-tenth as many cases as reported in May were recorded for June. The marked increases in the number of cases of gonorrhea and syphilis are to be accounted for by cases recorded from the camps and do not signify the improved general reporting of these diseases which is being insisted upon by state and federal authorities.

Smallpox. Reported cases for May, 1914, were cut in half in June, 610 cases. The highest county totals for June follow: Scioto 81 cases, Cuyahoga 68, Butler 46, Summit 44, Ashtabula 35, Henry 32, Hamilton 29, Mercer 20, Jackson and Mahoning 17 each. For no other county was a total of 15 or more cases recorded for the month.

Typhoid Fever. The reported total of 168 cases for June slightly exceeds the figure for June, 1917, 152 cases, but is below the figure for June, 1916, 281 cases. The reported cases for June of this year have been checked against death certificates, with the resultant addition of II cases not previously reported. The reported cases were well scattered in 62 of the counties of the state, only 20 counties reporting 3 or more cases as follows: Adams 3 cases, Allen 4, Franklin 8, Gallia 3, Hamilton 6, Jefferson 8, Lawrence 6, Licking 3, Logan 7, Lucas 16, Mahoning 4, Medina 3, Montgomery 9, Portage 4, Scioto 8, Stark 4, Summit 3, Trumbull 3, Van Wert 5, Wayne 3.

Meningitis, Cerebrospinal. The 18 cases recorded for June were reported from cities as follows: Cleveland 12, Cincinnati 3, Massillon 1, Dayton 1, Youngstown i.

Poliomyelitis. The seven cases were reported from the following districts: Cleveland 3, Cincinnati 1, Springfield 1, Lawrence County, Fayette Township, 2, and Scioto County, Rarden Township I.

TABLE I. REPORTED CASES OF NOTIFIABLE DISEASES, OHIO, JUNE, 1916-1918, WITH DISTRIBUTION FOR CITIES AND FOR VILLAGES AND TOWNSHIPS, JUNE, 1918, AND CASE

RATES PER 1,000 POPULATION, JUNE, 1916-1918.

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* Reported cases from Camp Sherman and Wright Aviation Field included in total figures.

TABLE II. REPORTED CASES, TEN NOTIFIABLE DISEASES, WITH TOTAL CASE RATES PER 1,000 POPULATION, OHIO

CITIES, JUNE, 1918.

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TABLE II. REPORTED CASES, TEN NOTIFIABLE DISEASES, WITH TOTAL CASE RATES PER 1,000 POPULATION, OHIO

CITIES, JUNE, 1918 — Concluded.

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.427 7
1

6
(No cases reported)
1.057 1 7 1 1

3
1

1 .950 10

1 6 2 1 .128 4 1 1

2 .770 7

5

2 .351 3 1

1

1
3.708 88 2
26

3
3

53
(No cases reported)
.621 9 1

1

4 2 1
.924 28

1
1
1

7
1.248 8 2 6
.158
1

1 .332 2

2
1.485 15
9

1

1 2 2 .343 7

5 2
.680 5 1 2
3.040

160
1 60

2 12 1
.315 9 1 2

3

2 1 .076 1

1 1.140 228 12 29

14 7 37 16 113 .790 5 4

1
1.287 11
6

2 2
.645 5
2

3
. 153
1

1
1.332 18
12

1 4
.585 5

4 1 2.175 15

15 (No cases reported) .483 31 11............................ 2 1......

(No cases reported) 1.260 | 140 | 8 | 35 | 1/1 113 | 14 714 66 . 155 5 1

2 2

83

*

Reports from Ironton and Wooster were incomplete.

Case Reports. Death certificates reveal unreported cases of notifiable diseases. It has not been possible in Ohio to check deaths against case reports until recent arrangements with the State Bureau of Vital Statistics gave to the State Department of Health information, not only as to the names and addresses of persons dying of notifiable diseases but also as to the physician in attendance. Certain local departments of health make it a practice to check reports against deaths, calling unreported cases resulting in deaths to the attention of the physician who has failed to report. All local departments should fol

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