Sidebilder
PDF
ePub

DEATHS OF CHILDREN UNDER FIVE YEARS. OF AGE IN OHIO, BY

COUNTIES, IN FIRST SIX MONTHS OF 1918, WITH 1916 TOTALS
OF SUCH DEATHS AND BABY-SAVING QUOTAS FOR 1918 BASED
ON THOSE TOTALS – Concluded.

[graphic]

Total six

months.
Total for six

months if
quota had
been saved.

26

Mercer
Miami
Monroe
Montgomery
Morgan
Morrow
Muskingum
Noble
Ottawa
Paulding
Perry
Pickaway
Pike
Portage
Preble
Putnam
Richland
Ross
Sandusky
Scioto
Seneca
Shelby
Stark
Summit
Trumbull
Tuscarawas
Union
Van Wert.
Vinton
Warren
Washington
Wayne
Williams
Wood
Wyandot

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

18 30 30 22 75 22

19 123 230 66 41 13 14

9 16 29 22 12 30 9

50

61
12
16
4
3
1
3
5
4
1
10
1

[ocr errors]

98
72

10
104
29

457124

16 22 16 19 52 39 18 52 13

14 37 10

1

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

DEATHS FROM ALL CAUSES FOR ALL AGES AND UNDER 5 YEARS

OF AGE, WITH RATES FOR ALL AGES PER 1,000 POPULATION
AND PER CENT. OF TOTAL DEATHS OCCURRING UNDER 5
YEARS OF AGE, BY COUNTIES, 1916-1917.

[blocks in formation]

65 170

42 163 148

59 413

42 258 28 52 177 66

38

Adams
Allen
Ashland
Ashtabula
Athens
Auglaize
Belmont
Brown
Butler
Carroll
Champaign
Clark
Clermont
Clinton
Columbiana
Coshocton
Crawford
Cuyahoga
.Darke
Defiance
Delaware
Erie
Fairfield
Fayette
Franklin
Fulton
Gallia
Geauga
Greene
Guernsey
Hamilton
Hancock
Hardin
Harrison
Henry
Highland
Hocking
Holmes
Huron
Jackson
Jefferson
Knox
Lake
Lawrence

[blocks in formation]

252
70

54 12.2 11.3 21.5 155 12.3 14.6 19.7

28 14.6 12.6 11.9 143

14.3 14.4 17.6
136 12.5 13.0 22.0

50 12.5 10.1 15.1
373
14.3

14.2 33.3
37 12.7 13.2 13.3
265 14.2 13.9 23.1
18 11.8 10.8 13.6
45 14.5

13.6 13.6 180 15.1 15.8 16.4 41 16.2 12.9 13.8

41 13.7 12.3 11.7 255 13.7

14.3 22.5 40 11.6 10.5 19.7

19.4 16.9

9.2 15.2 19.3 15.9 29.7 11.3 23.8 10.6 12.5 15.9 10.8 14.0 21.6 12.4 18.0 27.1 15.3 14.8 10.5

434 11,233

493 329 390 683 420

267 3,942

298 428 195 465

485 7,654

492 475 206 238 398 284 199 457

330 1,053

391 335 523

494
12,153

503
291
381
740
490

294
4,060

284
423
184
440

493
7,728

420
401
256
248
391
281
221
482

422
1.063

365 357 631

57 2,972

87 42 58 53 68 48 609 47 57 23 68 123 1,218

78 90 30 34 53 67 35 56 87 371 59 58 157

89 12,7 14.5 13.1
3,292 14.7 15.5 26.5

77 11.4 11.6 17.6
43 13.4 11.9 12.8
40 14.1 13.7 14.9
70 17.6 19.1

7.8
80 9.9 11.4 16.2
68 12.3 13.5 18.0
619 11.0 15.4 15.4
46 12.1 11.5 15.8
41 16.6 16.4 13.3
21 13.3 12.5 11.8

66 15.6 14.8 14.6 115 10.1 10.1 25.3 1,096

15.5 15.5 15.9 59 13.0 11.1 15.9 62

15.6 13.2 18.9 29 10.8 13.4 14.6 38 9.5 9.9 14.3 52 13.9 13.6 13.3 56 12.0 11.9 23.6 44 11.1 12.3 17.6 62 12.9 13.5 12.3 115 | 10.7 13.7 26.4 305 13.4 13.2 ! 35.2 38 12.3 11.4

15.1 47 14.1 15.0 17.3 173 13.2 | 15.0 30.0

9.5 16.3 23.1 15.2 16.2

9.7 11.4 15.0 23.3 14.2 14.0 15.5 11.3 15.3 13.3 19.9 19.9 12.9 27.3 28.7 10.4 13.2 27.4

DEATHS FROM ALL CAUSES FOR ALL AGES AND UNDER 5 YEARS

OF AGE, WITH RATES FOR ALL AGES PER 1,000 POPULATION
AND PER CENT OF TOTAL DEATHS OCCURRING UNDER 5
YEARS OF AGE, BY COUNTIES, 1916-1917 — Concluded.

[blocks in formation]

807

759

368 1,021 3,879

214 2,731

551 328 381 307 679

231 3,227

258 195 876 240 288 183 367 359 196 473 277 303 671 598 399 883 633

121

48 305 895

52 867 101 50 46 56 76 37 486 20 29 137 72 47 42 85 72 43 76 27 60 103 105

111 13.2 12.3 15.0

43 13.1 12.2 12.2 250 12.9 11.2 26.5 789 17.7 17.5 23.3

40 13.3 10.8 19.6 945 17.2 18.2 | 34.7 100 13.2 14.6) 20.4 34 13.9 13.2 14.5 54 12.9 14.9 13.9 66 11.4 11.2 17.9 105

13.2 14.6 12.5 43 8.8 9.5 17.4 484 16.3 17.1 16.1 24

13.6 16.0 9.1 20 13.7 11.6 12.6 118 13.8 14.4 16.5 50 11.9 12.9 ! 32.4 49 11.0 12.8 19.2 30 8.5 8.1 21.7 91 9.2 9.7 | 24.6 63 11.6 13.7 23.8 41 12.0 12.5 22.9 67 15.1 15.2 16.3 45

13.8 11.6 8.2 64 11.2 10.1 17.9 103 12.6 13.4 16.5 102 13.5 14.9 19.4 50

13.0 11.1 15.9 285 15.2

16.4 31.1 96 14.1 14.6 12.1 51 12.8 12.0 21.0 451 14.4 15.9 20.7

335

962

Licking
Logan
Lorain
Lucas
Madison
Mahoning
Marion
Medina
Meigs
Mercer
Miami
Monroe
Montgomery
Morgan
Morrow
Muskingum
Noble
Ottawa
Paulding
Perry
Pickaway
Pike
Portage
Preble
Putnam
Richland
Ross
Sandusky
Scioto
Seneca
Shelby
Stark
Summit
Trumbull
Tuscarawas
Union
Van Wert.
Vinton
Warren
Washington
Wayne
Williams
Wood
Wyandot

395
1,149
3,848

265 2,499

494 344 330 313 609

213 3,018

219 230 829 222 246 194 345 303 188 468 330

296 2,277 3,070

969 676 286 264 171 352 538 518 299 567 2401

74 251 74 66 422 787 226 141 43 45 31 53 98 72 40 104 29

19.4 22.8 31.0 217 15.7 16.9 25.4 130 ! 12.2 11.4

19.5 33 12.4 13.1 15.8 36 8.7

9.1 17.8 38 | 12.6 13.1 18.8 49 16.5 14.4 13.2 76 12.0 11.8 18.0 78 13.6 13.6 13.8 32 12.5 | 11.8 | 12.6 125 11.7 | 12.2 19.1 29 11.3 11.6 11.8

14.6 11.7 24.5 20.3 18.7 34.6 18.1 10.4 14.2 21.5 15.5 18.6 15.0

9.3 10.3 13.5 20.8 17.0 16.4 24.8 17.5 20.9 14.2 16.2 21.1 15.4 17.1 12.5 32.3 15.2 17.2 19.8 31.3 22.4 19.2 11.5 13.6 22.2 13.9 14.1 15.1 10.7 22.0 12.1

626 540 464 807 610

315 2,034 2,541

891 724 272 253 165 403 544 520 317 544 245

Municipal Public Health Organization*

By Allen F. Gillihan, M. D., State District Health Officer,

Santa Rosa, Calif.

a

/

In order to understand the health and sanitary problems of a city of 35,000, it is first desirable to outline the process of an ideal health department, thus forming a basis with which to evaluate the actual work done in the average city of this size and on which to build an efficient department. These may be briefly registered as follows:

Health Department Functions
I-CONTROL OF COMMUNICABLE DISEASES.
1. Obtaining knowledge of cases

a. Reporting
b. Field investigation.

c. Laboratory diagnoses.
2. Control of patients and contacts.
-3. Epidemiological investigations.
4. Release of patients and contacts.

5. Morbidity statistics.
II - CONSERVATION OF CHILD LIFE.

1. Supervision of child's early life.

a. Prenatal supervision

Guidance of prospective mothers.
Supervision of midwives.

Supervision of maternity homes.
b. Care of the newborn -

Postnatal care.
Birth registration.

Control of ophthalmia.
Infant care

Supervision of baby and child farms.
Supervision of orphan asylums.
Baby week campaigns.

Little mothers' clubs.
2. Supervision of children of school age with regard to mental and

physical development.

3. Supervision of child labor. III - FOOD SUPERVISION.

1. Milk Registration of producers and dealers, supervision of 2. Foodstuffs? plants and products by field inspectors and labora3. Meats.

tory examinations. IV - SANITARY SUPERVISION.

supplies ?
Sewage saplosal Field work and laboratory invesigations.
Housing conditions.
Industrial conditions.
Wastes and refuse disposal.

Elimination of insects and animals transmitting disease.
V - VITAL STATISTICS.

Birth registration.
Death registration.

Burial registration,

Reprinted from the California State Board of Health Monthly Bulletin, XIV, 1 (July, 1918).

}

We find in the average city that Birth registration is not actively we have a part-time health officer enforced, so no determination can who is usually engaged in active be made of infant mortality rates. practice. He can not enforce health Nothing is done about child labor. measures without creating antago- Under food supervision we very nism amongst his professional frequently find more activity brethren, and amongst his own pa- shown than in any other departtients to the detriment of his prac- ment. A milk inspector, and fretice; therefore we find him doing quently a food inspector, will be as little as possible.

found, and occasionally stock is inIn the control of communicable spected at the time of killing. diseases we find lax reporting, and Sanitary supervision is usually more lax supervision. The quaran- reduced to the abatement of nuitinable diseases are placarded, but

sances, and is a very secondary the complaints of the public are part of the work of the plumbing depended upon to secure observ- inspector. ance of the quarantine regulations. A laboratory is usually mainNo epidemiological investigation is tained for the examination of undertaken, and the unnecessary swabs for diphtheria and sputum expense of fumigation is indulged for tuberculosis for diagnoses. in. The quarantining and fumigat- Bacterial and chemical examination ing are very frequently done by of milk is also done, but we find the plumbing inspector, or sanitary as little as possible is done where inspector, as a side issue to his

the pay is part time and there is regular duties.

no incentive to increase the amount The health officer usually makes

of work. no examination for release from quarantine or isolation. He in

Public Health Bookkeeping variably neglects the minor dis

Under office detail we usually eases, makes no tabulations other

find a clerk whose duties are about than those required by the state equally divided between receiving board, and is unable to work out a

reports of cases of communicable morbidity rate; in fact, I doubt if diseases from physicians, ordering he knows what such a thing is. quarantines and fumigations, re

In the conservation of child life, ceiving and registering birth cerwith possibly the exception of tificates, death certificates, issuing medical inspection in schools, prac- burial permits, answering 'phone tically nothing is being done in the kicks, issuing permits for milk, average city. We frequently find meat, and other vendors, and makbaby week campaigns have been ing reports to the State Board. held; these are usually fostered by No bookkeeping of public health is mothers' clubs of the city, but this done, therefore no information is very good work is not followed available which would show the up by the health department. No health situation of the city. An supervision of midwives, maternity annual report is usually not prehomes, or homes for children is pared. "Bookkeeping of Public undertaken, except possibly the Health” is a very good term borregistration of midwives. (Under rowed from Irving Fisher. A city the present laws of California any- which does not do such bookkeepbody can be a midwife.)

ing is on a par with the business

« ForrigeFortsett »