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Total cases pending September 1 from August, 46; investigated by Department nurses 16, referred to public health nurses 2, histories unobtainable 2, pending investigation October 1 from August, 26. Total pending investigation October 1, 48.

Discharged Tuberculous Soldiers. — Notifications of discharged tuberculous soldiers in September, with totals since the beginning of work in behalf of these men, are summarized as follows:

September. Summary. Notifications received

175

741 Cases referred to public health nurses.

115

509 Reports received from public health nurses.

30

261 Cases written directly.

60

227 Replies received

9

55 Cases visited by Division nurses.

11

161 Cases admitted to sanatoria..

3

27 Cases not found....

16

113 Cases not heard from.

133

196

DIVISION OF INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE

Summary of Activities in August, 1918 The coal mines survey has been continued during the month, eighteen mines having been investigated. In addition twelve physicians in coal mining communities were interviewed, as well as two district deputy mine inspectors. The field work in connection with the survey of two large munition plants was also completed.

A paper was prepared for the Health and Old Age Insurance Commission outlining the health standards for industry, the violation of which constitutes industrial health hazards.

An investigation was conducted relative to the cause of a number of cases of conjunctivitis occurring among employees of a firm manufacturing heels for shoes from a leather substitute. Chemical analyses of the pulp used were made by the Laboratory of the Department and the probable cause found to be sulphuretted hydrogen and tannin. Recommendations were made with the view of protecting the men from future trouble.

Two cases of oil furunculosis were reported by physicians, and, in addition, 174 cases of tuberculosis among industrial workers were included in physicians' reports during this time.

DIVISION OF LABORATORIES

Summary of Activities in August, 1918 The Division made 1,552 examinations in August, of which 1,179 were bacteriological and 373 were chemical. The bacteriological examinations, with their results, were as follows: Tuberculosis, pos. 109, neg. 221, unsatis. 0..

330 Diphtheria, pos. 34, neg. 146, no growth 12, susp. 9.

201 Typhoid, pos. 43, neg. 80, susp. 2..

125 Wassermann, pos. 82, neg. 242, susp. 21.

345 Rabies, pos. 5, neg. 11, unsatis. 5..

21 Water

135 Miscellaneous

22

Outfits were distributed in the following quantities:
Tuberculosis
Diphtheria
Typhoid
Malaria
Wassermann
Ophthalmia
Typhoid vaccine
Chemical — water and sewage.
Bacterial — water and sewage.

[graphic]

446 508 220

22 538 2,654 306

32 142

Total

4,903

The chemical samples examined included 70 samples of foods and 81 of drugs. Results of the food examinations were: satisfactory 28, misbranded 6, adulterated 31, insufficient information 5. The misbranded products were one lemon extract and five miscellaneous extracts. The adulterated foods were: vinegar 16, milk 8, butter 1, hamburg 1, lemon extract 3, pop i, miscellaneous 2.

Reports on the drugs were as follows: satisfactory 44, misbranded 12, adulterated 14, insufficient information it. The misbranded drugs included eight proprietaries and four miscellaneous. Those adulterated were: tincture of iodine 1, camphorated oil 1, bay rum 1, witch hazel 1, essence of ginger i, proprietaries 3, miscellaneous 6.

Summary of Activities in September, 1918 The Division made 1,618 examinations in September, of which 1,354 were bacteriological and 264 were chemical. The bacteriological examinations, with their results, were as follows:

Tuberculosis, pos. 75, neg. 183....
Diphtheria, pos. 51, neg. 155, susp. 6, no growth 15.
Typhoid, pos. 93, neg. 114, susp. 3..
Wasserman, pos. 120, neg. 308, unsatis. 12.
Malaria, pos. 0, neg. 2..
Rabies, pos. 6, neg. 5, unsat. 2.
Water
Miscellaneous

258 227 210 440

2 13 174 30

Outfits were distributed in the following quantities :

246

Tuberculosis
Diphtheria
Typhoid
Malaria
Wassermann
Ophthalmia
Typhoid Vaccine
Miscellaneous
Chemical, water and sewage.
Bacterial, water and sewage.

141 361

18 788 1,402 828 87 24 231

Total

4,126

The chemical samples examined included 46 samples of foods and 44 of drugs. Results of the food examinations were: satisfactory 24, misbranded 6, adulterated 13, insufficient information 3. One of the misbranded products was an egg substitute and the others were listed as miscellaneous goods and extracts. The adulterated substances were: milk 3, butter 1, vinegar 3, pop 3, vanilla extract 3.

Reports on the drugs were as follows: satisfactory 35, misbranded I, adulterated 5, insufficient information 3. The misbranded drug was listed as miscellaneous. The adulterated drugs included one tincture of iodine, one sodium salicylate and three miscellaneous.

DIVISION OF SANITARY ENGINEERING

Summary of Activities in August, 1918 Investigations by the Division during August dealt with thirteen existing and five proposed water supplies and water purification systems, with four existing and ten proposed sewerage systems and sewagę treatment plants, with three cases of alleged nuisance, with one school site, with one case of general sanitary conditions and with one case of garbage disposal.

Two sets of water supply and water purification plans and sixteen sets of sewerage and sewage treatment plans were received and examined.

Reports submitted to the Commissioner of Health dealt with an investigation of alleged pollution of the Auglaize River by industrial wastes from Delphos, with proposed sewerage and sewage disposal for a portion of the village of Milan, with the proposed East Side intercepting sanitary sewer for Canton and with two minor sewerage and sewage treatment projects.

A sample of sand representing the material to be used in intermittent sand filters for the Kidder Country Club, Montgomery County, was approved, fulfilling the second condition of approval of plans for the sewage treatment works.

Twenty conferences regarding water supplies, sewerage and related subjects were held.

Eight certificates of approval of railroad water supplies were issued and two applications for such certificates were refused.

Summary of Activities in September, 1918 Investigations by the Division during September dealt with ten existing and four proposed water supplies and water purification systems, and with twelve existing and eleven proposed sewerage systems and sewage treatment plants.

Three sets of water supply and water purification plans and eighteen sets of sewerage and sewage disposal plans were examined.

Reports were submitted to the Commissioner of Health regarding two minor sewer projects.

A sample of sand representing filtering material to be used in the sewage treatment plant at Eden Township school, Wyandot County, was approved.

Seven conferences on sanitary engineering subjects were held with city officials, engineers, health officials and other interested persons.

Three certificates of approval of railroad water supplies were granted and one was refused.

DIVISION OF PLUMBING

Summary of Activities in August, 1918 Seventy-seven inspections and six investigations were made by the Division in August. Four certificates of approval were issued and five sets of plans were approved. Seven conferences were held.

BUREAU OF PUBLICITY, DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATION

Summary of Activities in August, 1918 Thirteen publicity stories were released during the month, of which eleven were issued through the weekly News Letter, attaining a total circulation of 3,404,684 printed copies (incomplete), an average of 309,517 copies per story.

Three social hygiene pamphlets (5,000 copies of each) were received from the printer. Copy for Volume IX, Number 8 (August, 1918) of the Ohio Public HEALTH JOURNAL was prepared for the printer. Requisitions for ten pieces of printing and bindery work were issued.

Thirty-three books and pamphlets were added to the Library during the month.

Summary of Activities, September, 1918 Seventeen newspaper publicity stories were released during the month. The sixteen of these which were released through the weekly News Letter attained a story circulation (total number of printed copies) of 3,800,070 (incomplete) or an average of 237,504 copies per story.

A second printing of 10,000 copies each of the three sex hygiene pamphlets recently issued by the Department, and 500 and 750 copies, respectively, of two reprints from the August Ohio PUBLIC HEALTH JOURNAL were ordered. A new and up-to-date list of Department publications was compiled.

Copy was prepared for Volume IX, Number 9 (September, 1918), of the OHIO PUBLIC HEALTH JOURNAL. To permit a change in the date of going to press from the oth to the 31st of the month, it was decided to delay printing the September number and to combine it with the October number as a double issue.

Ten books, eighteen pamphlets and the usual periodicals were received for the Department library.

CONSERVE MILK AND SUPPLY CHILDREN FIRST,

URGES FEDERAL BUREAU

"The results of underfeeding or war, provided that the adult civilindiscriminate food substitution in ian population might have milk only childhood are startlingly shown after the needs of children, abroad as a result of the war, and mothers, invalids and the army are beginning to be evident in our were met. own great cities.” And “milk has The report discusses the various no substitute in the diet of the forms in which cow's milk may be child.” These and other unquali-, used for children. For the young fied statements of the importance baby, it says, there is nothing so of guarding the milk supply to pre- good as mother's milk. vent the physical deterioration of But for children under 2, other American children during the war than those breast fed, and for older are scattered through the latest re- children, the report states that port issued by the Children's Bu- cows' milk is an absolute necessity reau of the U. S. Department of

if disease and death are to be kept Labor and entitled “Milk, the In- within bounds and if the coming dispensable Food for Children." generation is to survive and to sus

This report presents figures tain the national standards. showing a decrease in the amount

"It is the duty now of every inof milk now available and in the

dividual community to see that its amount which is finding its way to

children have milk of good quality the children in poor homes. It not

and in sufficient amount to assure only emphasizes the fact that chil

their normal development," urges dren who are deprived of milk can the report. “To do this the price not thrive properly, but it analyzes of milk must be controlled or fixed, the changes in the production and

and the milk supply to infants and export of dairy products during the

children carefully safeguarded." war and shows the necessity of public action.

"The nourishment of our chil- The New York City health dedren is the first duty of the Nation. partment has estimated that at Since milk and milk products are some time or other in their lives a vital necessity for children, for eight out of every ten men and five nursing mothers, and for the sick out of every ten women have had and wounded, the public should be gonorrhea at least once. made to realize that the children's need for dairy products should be The first scoring of Ashtabula assured," the report asserts.

restaurants and other eating-places England and Italy have regu- by the city health department lated the sale of cream and cur- under a new inspection ordinance tailed the use of butter, in order resulted in scores ranging from 57 that their child population might to 96 percent. A score of 70 is receive the more adequate and required for a city license. The economical nourishment offered by scores were published in the Ashwhole milk. Germany, early in the

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tabula papers.

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