Sidebilder
PDF
ePub

TABLE II. REPORTED CASES, TEN NOTIFIABLE DISEASES, TOTAL CASE RATE UER 1,000 POPULATION, OHIO CITIES,

NOVEMBER, 1918 - Concluded.

Cities.

[blocks in formation]

Mt. Vernon?
Nelsonville
New Philadelphia..
Newark
Niles?
Norwalki
Norwood
Painesville
Piqua
Portsmouth
Ravenna
St. Bernard
St. Marys
Salem
Sandusky
Sidney
Springfield
Steubenville
Tiffin
Toledo
Troy
Urbana
Van Wert?
Wapakoneta
Warren
Washington C. H..
Wellston'
Wellsville
Wooster
Xenia
Youngstown
Zanesville

[blocks in formation]

.332 .891 .490 .136 .605 .735 .228 .580 .474 .819

2

4 3

10

1 35 21

3
116

3
7

2 1 24

12
2
1

[blocks in formation]

33

[ocr errors]
[blocks in formation]

6

[blocks in formation]

· Barberton, Dover, Gallipolis, Greenville, Kenton, Marietta, Martins Ferry, Mt. Vernon, Niles, Norwalk, Painesville and Wellston reported no cases of the diseases listed.

2 East Liverpool, Lancaster, St. Bernard, Van Wert, Warren and Youngstown failed to submit the regular summary report by date of going to press.

DIVISION OF LABORATORIES.

Summary of Activities in November, 1918. The Division made 1,153 examinations during November, of which 927 were bacteriological and 226 were chemical. The bacteriological examinations, with their results, are summarized as follows:

218 112

Tưberculosis. Pos. 66, Neg. 182.
Diphtheria, Pos, 24, Neg. 82, No Growth 6.
Typhoid, Pos. 17, Neg. 47.
Wassermann, Pos. 117, Veg. 273, Unsat. 12.
Malaria, Pos. 0, Neg. 1.
Rabies, Pos. 5, Neg. 2, Unsat. 1.
Water
Miscellaneous

102

1

79 13

337 201

Outfits were distributed as follows during the month :
Tuberculosis
Diphtheria
Typhoid
Malaria
Wassermann
Ophthalmia
Typhoid Vaccine
Miscellaneous
Chemical Water and Sewage.
Bacterial Water and Sewage.

28 127 3.478

37 1.) 91

Total

4.774

The chemical samples examined included 47 specimens of foods and 28 of drugs. Results of the food examinations were: satisfactory 22. misbranded 3, adulterated 12, insufficient information 10. The misbranded foods were two egg substitutes and one miscellaneous. Those found adulterated were: milk 3, vinegar 4, oysters 3. lemon extract 2. Reports on the drugs were: satisfactory 16, misbranded +, adulterated 6. insufficient information 2. Those misbranded were: tincture of iodine 1, camphorated oil 1, bay rum 1. proprietaries 1. Adulterated products were three each of camphorated oil and miscellaneous drugs.

DIVISION OF SANITARY ENGINEERING.

Summary of Activities in November, 1918. Investigations by representatives of the Division during the month dealt with two proposed and three existing sewerage and sewage disposal systems and with one proposed and eleven existing water supplies and water purification plants. The disposal of industrial wastes from the plant of the army chemical warfare service, Nela Park, Cleveland. was also the subject of an investigation. Nine sets of plans were received during the month.

Among these were plans for proposed sanitary sewers for Niles and for proposed new water supplies for Jewett and Mansfield.

Four samples of sand to be used as filtering material were approved. Five conferences were held.

Four certificates of approval of railroad water supplies were issued. the city water supplies of Mansfield and Conneaut being approved for railroad use. The Conneaut approval was due to the fact that since November i the purification plant in that city has been under the supervision of a technical operator, who makes regular analyses of the water, Approval of water from wells at Dillonvale and Phalanx was refused the New York Central Railroad

DIVISION OF INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE.

Summary of Activities in November, 1918. The Division received, investigated and closed two industrial hygiene complaints during November. Eight requests for advice were answered and two such requests were pending at the end of the month. Reports on the coal mining industry in Ohio and Illinois were in progress. Twenty-one abstracts and one editorial were prepared for the American Journai of Public Health..

BUREAU OF PUBLICITY, DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATION.

Summary of Activities in November, 1918. Thirteen publicity stories were released during the month, twelve of which, issued through the weekly New Letter, reached a total of 1,403,483 printed copies (an average of 116,936 per story), appearing in 106 newspapers in 89 cities and villages in 60 counties.

A new edition of the Department's Soda Fountain Regulations (Administrative Bulletin 126B) was issued. In the hands of the printer were new editions of the three social hygiene pamphlets of the Department-Health Education Bulletin 124B, “Some Things a Young Man Should Know About Sex and Sex Diseases"; H. E. B 125B, “How Any Boy Can Develop His Health and Strength"; H. E. B. 126B, “Instructing Your Child in the Facts of Sex"--and a series of three educational circulars (E. C. 114, E. C. 115 and E. C. 116) on gonorrhea, syphilis and chancroids, respectively. Distribution of publications during the month totaled 11,730.

By elimination of duplications (addresses to which two or more copies were being sent monthly) from the Ohio Public Health JOURNAL mailing list, a net saving of 408 copies a month was effected.

Seven volumes were added to the Department Library.

DIVISION OF PUBLIC HEALTH EDUCATION AND

TUBERCULOSIS. Summary of Activities in November, 1918. Miss Norah D. Abbe and Mrs. Jean K. Graham joined the Division's staff of public health nurses in November.

A new system for the following up by the Division of positive sputum reports made by the Division of Laboratories was installed. In accordance with orders from the Governor, instructions were issued and forms were supplied to the 155 local draft boards of the State for the reporting of notifiable disease cases disclosed by their physical examinations; it is believed that the closing of draft board work December 10 will interfere with the success of this arrangement.

At a meeting of commissioners from four counties of Proposed Hospital District No. 7, in New Philadelphia Nov. 15, no definite action was taken and another meeting was set for January 16, at St. Clairsville.

Notifications of tuberculosis hospital admissions and discharges received in November were as follows:

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][subsumed][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Total notifications 220: referred to local public health nurses 167, investigated
by Division nurses 20, histories unobtainable 11, pending investigation at end of
month 21.

Pending investigation November 1 from October 63: investigated by Division
nurses 22, referred to local public health nurses 2, still pending at end of month 39,

Total pending investigation December 1, 60.

Changes in the local public health nursing service were as follows:

Miss Marie Mueller, Lima, resigned; succeeded by Miss Ethel Montague,
assisted by Miss Marion Foote.

Miss Edith Heddrick, Cuyahoga County, resigned; succeeded by Miss Blanche
E. Sanderson.

Mrs. Rosezella Fischer, Springfield public schools, resigned; succeeded by
Mrs. Margaret Grey.

Miss L. G. Walters, Norwalk public schools, resumed her duties.

Miss Celina Dunbar, Bucyrus, resigned to take charge of public health nursing
in Chillicothe.

Work among discharged tuberculous soldiers during the month,
with totals since the beginning of this activity, is summarized as follows:

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][subsumed][merged small][subsumed][merged small]

November reports of inflammation of the eyes of the newborn, with
action taken, are summarized as follows:

Cases reported 105, classified as follows: (by race) white 92, colored 10, un-
known 3; (by sex) male 60, female 40, unknown 5; (by source of report) reported
by physicians 22, by midwives 3C, by nurses 10, by physicians and nurses 2. by
institutions 41. Cases investigated by Division 3, cases provided with nursing
care 4.

*One patient spent time in two institutions during month of November.

HEALTH OFFICERS' ROUNDTABLE

14 said, "No."

Dr. Starr With U. S. P. H. S. cided answers, 309 said, “Yes," and

Dr. E. B. Starr, Springfield director of public health, is on a

"This does not imply," comsix month's leave of absence, be- ments the Bureau, "that inspection ginning December 24, during which should be at the expense of bactime he will be in the industrial hy- teriological and chemical control; giene division of the United States but that there should be co-ordinaPublic Health Service. Dr. C. G. tion between laboratory control and Augustus, assistant director under dairy farm inspection. Which is the Dr. Starr, is serving as acting more important depends entirely director. Dr. Augustus has been in

upon local conditions. the Public Health Service since last

"Dairy inspection is of greatest August, but has been released to

importance in the smaller cities take Dr. Starr's place in Spring- where the bulk of the milk is sold field. Dr. Starr is stationed in

in the raw state. The milk supply Washington.

might not be large enough to jusPromotion for Dr. Craven.

tify compulsory pasteurization; and

from a public health standpoint, Dr. Oscar M. Craven, formerly every safeguard must be thrown district physician in the Cincinnati about its production and handling. health department, has been pro- Dairy inspection is especially immoted to chief medical inspector portant in communities where milk and assistant health officer, which control activities are being inauposition was held by

by Health

Health gurated, since the producer must Officer W. H. Peters before the

be taught how to produce, handle, latter's promotion to his present and transport milk in a cleanly, position as successor to the late

safe manner. Dr. J. H. Landis.

"To be satisfactory, the inspection of dairy farms must be car

ried on by competent inspectors. Dairy Inspection Favored.

They should have a practical, symHealth officers of the United pathetic knowledge of dairy farm States are almost unanimously in conditions; they should know the favor of farm inspection as a

essential features in the production method of insuring safe milk sup- and handling of safe and clean plies, according to a vote taken milk; and they must be able to during the summer of 1918 by the distinguish between those factors Bureau of Animal Industry, United which make for public health and States Department of Agriculture, those having relation to cleanliness on the question, “Do you consider or economy of production and farm inspection important enough handling of the product. to be continued ?" Of the 323 "Dairy inspection has broader health officers who returned de- meaning than simply looking into

« ForrigeFortsett »