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ARMS AND HABITATIONS OF THE MADI.

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We met with two new trees, both handsome, and one of them, the Sheabutter, called “ Meepampa” by Manua, resembled an oak in girth and general outline; its flowers scented the air and were covered with the honey-bee. The other we found to be a new species of Boscia, with long lanceolate leaves and terminal inflorescence. The people here, though differing very little in their mode of painting themselves from the Gani, are called “Madi.” Their women have the same small fringe in front, and the same appendage behind, formed of fresh green weeds, plucked daily from the edges of water, and hanging from their waists to their knees. Their arms are spears seven feet long, bamboo bows, bound round with leather thongs, and arrows of reed. As many as ten arrows, each with a different-shaped barb, are sometimes carried by one man ; their peculiarity is that they have no feathers, and their barbs are as straight as a nail, lance-shaped, or like a broad arrow having hooks; and though none of those we saw were poisoned, all were cruelly notched, to make them more difficult of extraction. The interiors of their palisaded villages are kept very clean ; idol horns and miniature huts, near which grow medical plants, such as Bryophyllum calycinum and Amaranthus (love lies bleeding) are always to be seen. The houses are cylinders of bamboo wicker-work, plastered inside to make them warm, and have steep roofs of bamboo and grass. Game-nets, arms, two-feet-long horns (made of gourd, the shape of a telescope), buffalo foot-traps, slabs for grinding grain, &c., are in the interior. The mode of roosting hens is novel ; a five-feet-long stick, having three prongs, is stuck into the floor of the

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house, and the hen hatches upon grass placed upon the forks. A custom which we had not before observed was, that in the early morning a jar of hot water was sent us to wash with ; and along with this came a present of some beer of the country.

De Bono's ivory - traders had selected Faloro, a favourable position, for their camp, situated on the concave side of a hill, with a stream below. Our junction with them at sunset of the 3d December was one of those happy epochs which can never be forgotten. We announced our approach by firing guns when within a few hundred yards of the settlement, and a very lively scene ensued. Turkish banners flew, welcome guns were fired, and an army of well-dressed men, “fezzed” or turbaned, turned out with drums and fifes to greet our arrival and escort us the rest of the way. A procession was formed, with music and colours in the van, the two commanders with drawn sabres went next, and then we followed in our rags of clothes, the soldiers bringing up the rear. passed outside the village enclosure others joined, kissing our hands; women shouted shrilly with delight, and we were told to be seated upon a bed covered with leopard-skins placed for us in front of commander “ Mahomed's" door. The traders all knew Petherick by name, but they either could not or would not tell us anything about him, excepting that he was twenty marches away to the north, and that our letter sent to him from Unyoro had not been forwarded.

Everything around us looked strange; we had become such “roughs” that the most common object in this semi-civilised life gave us pleasure. Every one seemed so well dressed, they had all shoes, regular

As we

CAMP OF EGYPTIANS.

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bedsteads, crockery, &c., none of which we had seen for more than two years. The scenes also in a camp of Egyptians were new to us. Mahomed, the commander, seated on a low stool, while being shaved by a barber, excited the wonder of the Wanyoro. A white napkin being placed on his chest, the boy strapped the razor with the rapidity of lightning, and, standing with extended arms, passed his instrument over the whole head and beard at a frightful pace, handing his master a gilt frame looking-glass when the operation was completed. Donkeys were ridden at a sharp amble, without saddle or bridle, driven by a long stick, and the rider seated in the native fashion on the animals haunches. Riding-oxen, with halters and ropes through their noses, were exercised about the village by negro lads, who made them go at a fast trot. Our bedding and cooking utensils not having arrived, we requested Mahomed to have some dinner prepared for us. At once he offered a cow, but it was late, and we did not wish to wait till it was killed. Coffee in true Arab style was served, and an attendant stood by offering occasionally tin mugs full of native-made beer. When dinner was ready, a crowd squatted beside us, and a woman stood with water to drink. The repast was minced meat in balls served in a tureen, a roast leg of goat in another tureen, honey and thin cakes of sorghum ; all looked inviting, and we longed to begin. We found, however, that there were no spoons, knives, or forks ; and we made the most of it without them, and enjoyed an excellent dinner, which we had not done for many a day. But the greatest treat was to come—water was brought us to wash our hands, and, luxury of all luxuries, soap b!

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After the repast was finished, we were gratified to find that the remains were placed before our Seedees; Mabrook was so surprised on receiving a cup full of honey, that he inquired whether it was to be eaten? and after having dined, they all had soap and water served to them by one of the Nubians. A large open shed was made over to us, but we could not retire to rest without a prayer of thankfulness to the Almighty for having preserved us through so many difficulties, and at length, by His all-protecting arm, brought us in safety to the boundary of civilisation, after twenty-six months of unceasing toil and anxiety.

CHAPTER XIV.

FROM DECEMBER 3, 1862, TO JANUARY 11, 1863—FALORO, LATI

TUDE 3° 15' N. THE TOORKEES OR TURKS REGIMENTAL PARADE-MOONLIGHT DANCE-PRODUCTS OF FALORO-WILD ANIMALS — MIANI'S TREE AT APUDDO-AUTHOR HEARS OF THE DEATH OF CAPTAIN SPEKE-PREPARATIONS FOR ENTERING THE BARI COUNTRY.

Ar Faloro we found upwards of a hundred men of every Egyptian caste, colour, and costume. They were called by the natives of the country “Toorkee,” or Turks; but there was not a true Turk amongst them, and only one or two European countenances. Curly locks were exceptional, and wool predominated. They were adventurers without homes, born in the most northern Egyptian dominions from negro stock. We afterwards ascertained that the bazaar at Khartoum was full of such idlers ready for any employ. The merchants there engage them to go into the interior for the purpose of collecting ivory; guns are put into their hands, an intelligent native is placed over them, and they are sent up the Bahr Abiad (White Nile) as ivory-hunters, not to return perhaps for several years. These were the men we were so glad to meet, but from

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