History of the United States of America Under the Constitution: 1831-1847. 1880

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Fight of the Bank for a renewed existence Biddle in politics
54
Discontent of South Carolina freetrade arguments
62
Bills to recharter the Bank and revise the tariff sent to the Presi
68
Issues of Presidential canvass new political elements
76
Campaign results Jackson reelected Van Buren VicePresi
82
Defiance to the Union nullifying ordinance
88
Tariff reduction bill in House the force bill in Senate
94
CHAPTER XIV
112
Tours of Clay and Webster new era of travel
122
Early locomotives and trains accidents State charters
129
Secret plan of removing the deposits cabinet opinions Secre
137
Congress assembles appearance of the Capitol members
147
Clay leads the assault upon the President panic session
160
Jackson protests against Senate resolution Taney and other
165
From distress to inflation mania for local bank charters
173
Attempt on the Presidents life
179
Section II
188
Early Whig gains State elections Presidential candidates
197
New antislavery movement the situation reviewed
203
Condition in 1831 slave insurrection in Virginia new northern
209
Antislavery riots incendiary speeches and pamphlets Garrison
217
House petitions and the Pinckney resolutions gagrule
224
Arkansas and Michigan admitted local deposits sanctioned
229
Van Buren chosen President election returns and methods
236
France conforms to the treaty amicable settlement
243
Offers made to Mexico American settlers Jackson and Houston
251
Money crisis approaching local banks multiplied craze of specu
257
Distress of the poor New York fire flour riots
263
Jackson and Jefferson compared strong personal supremacy
272
Public deposits lost revenue dwindles specie circular
279
Bill lost acts for temporary relief surplus distribution post
285
New Whig gains administration unpopular State elections
286
New York banks lead for resumption collapse of United States
292
Van Burens administration reviewed personal character
349
CHAPTER XVI
359
CHAPTER XVII
367
The Virginia clique Tylers constitutional scruples
373
SubiTreasury repealed President signs the bill
379
Whig efforts to conciliate second Bank bill agreed upon
385
The Botts letter Tylers breach with Whig party complete
392
British right of search for slaves proposal to compromise north
399
Tylers breach with his party widens the axe of patronage
405
American industries North and South cotton products north
411
Fruits of Whig victory lost Clays farewell to the Senate
417
Gagrule in Congress Adams and the Haverhill petition
424
A President without a party Whigs proclaim Clay for their
431
Executive expedients Webster leaves the cabinet celebration
437
Mexican spoliation claims aggression upon Mexico Jones
443
Tylers secret proposals Houston and his patron duplicity
449
New cabinet appointments Calhoun Secretary of State
457
AntiTexas letters of Clay and Van Buren Whig convention
465
Presidential campaign Clays canvass Tyler withdraws
471
Close election results New York decides the contest Polk
478
Annexation resolution passes House Senate amends by giving
484
Treaty with China last vetoes and nominations to office
490
Polks inauguration inaugural address character and ante
496
New official organ Globe sold out Daily Onion
502
The Oregon question conflicting title with Great Britain 604
508
British concessions prompt treaty defining Oregon boundary
513
Annexation leads to war Taylors military movements
521
Congress declares war American sentiment men and supplies 627
528
Secret instructions Commodore Sloat at Monterey and
534
Congress reassembles men and supplies voted a censorious
540
Mormon emigration from Illinois to the west of the Rocky
546
B Length of sessions of Congress 18311847
555
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Side 164 - Resolved, That the President, in the late Executive proceedings in relation to the public revenue, has assumed upon himself authority and power not conferred by the Constitution and laws, but in derogation of both.
Side 527 - The cup of forbearance had been exhausted, even before the recent information from the frontier of the Del Norte. But now, after reiterated menaces, Mexico has passed the boundary of the United States, has invaded our territory, and shed American blood upon the American soil.
Side 300 - Sir, when I heard the gentleman lay down principles which place the murderers of Alton side by side with Otis and Hancock, with Quincy and Adams, I thought those pictured lips [pointing to the portraits in the Hall] would have broken into voice to rebuke the recreant American — the slanderer of the dead.
Side 365 - Sir, I wish you to understand the true principles of the government; I wish them carried out; I ask nothing more...
Side 225 - That all petitions, memorials, resolutions, propositions or papers, relating in any way, or to any extent whatever, to the subject of slavery, or the abolition of slavery, shall, without being either printed or referred, be laid upon the table, and that no further action whatever shall be had thereon.
Side 222 - I would therefore call the special attention of Congress to the subject, and respectfully suggest the propriety of passing such a law as will prohibit, under severe penalties, the circulation in the Southern States, through the mail, of incendiary publications intended to instigate the slaves to insurrection.
Side 141 - Its responsibility has been assumed, after the most mature deliberation and reflection, as necessary to preserve the morals of the people, the freedom of the press, and the purity of the elective franchise...
Side 368 - ... secure to industry its just and adequate rewards, and to re-establish the public prosperity. In deciding upon the adaptation of any such measure to the end proposed, as well as its conformity to the constitution, I shall resort to the fathers of the great republican school for advice and instruction, to be drawn from their sage views of our system of government, and the light of their ever glorious example.
Side 234 - Jackson, while the contention lasted, would not stir a hand to sustain the mandate of the Supreme Court. "John Marshall has made his decision, now let him enforce it...
Side 511 - States would offer what he saw fit to call ' ' some further proposal for the settlement of the Oregon question more consistent with fairness and equity and with the reasonable expectations of the British Government.

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