Address of President Hoover at the Memorial Exercises at Arlington, National Cemetery, May 30, 1929

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1929 - 4 sider
 

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Side 1 - The High Contracting Parties solemnly declare in the names of their respective peoples that they condemn recourse to war for the solution of international controversies, and renounce it as an instrument of national policy in their relations with one another.
Side 1 - The High Contracting Parties agree that the settlement or solution of all disputes or conflicts of whatever nature or of whatever origin they may be, which may arise between them, shall never be sought except by pacific means.
Side 2 - As a result the pessimist calls this covenant a pious expression of loreign offices, a trick of statesmen on the hopes of humanity, for which we and other nations will be held responsible without reserve. With this view I cannot agree. But if this agreement is to fulfill its high purpose, we and other nations must accept its consequences: we must clothe faith and idealism with action. That action must march with the inexorable tread of common sense and realism to accomplishment.
Side 2 - ... be used only for defense. Consequently, if we are honest, we must reconsider our own naval armament and the armaments of the world in the light of their defensive and not their aggressive use. Our navy is the first, and in the world sense the only important, factor in our national preparedness. It is a powerful part of the arms of the world. To make ready for defense is a primary obligation upon every statesman and adequate' preparedness is an assurance against aggression.
Side 2 - With these principles before us our problem is to secure agreement among nations that we shall march together toward reductions in naval equipment. Despite the declarations of the Kellogg pact, every important country has since the signing of that agreement been engaged in strengthening its naval arm. We are still borne on the tide of competitive building.
Side 2 - Democracies can only be led to undertake the burdens of increasing naval construction by continued appeal to fear, by constant envisaging of possible conflict, by stimulated imaginings of national dangers, by glorification of war. Fear and suspicion will never slacken unless we can halt competitive construction of arms. They will never disappear unless we can turn this tide toward actual Deduction.
Side 2 - ... an instrument of national policy, it means at once an abandonment of the aggressive use of arms by every signatory nation and becomes a sincere declaration that all armament hereafter shall be used only for defense.
Side 2 - That is a declaration that springs from the aspirations and hearts of men and women throughout the world. It is a solemn covenant to which the great nations of the world have bound themselves. But notwithstanding this noble assurance, preparedness for war still advances steadily in every land.

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