Encyclopædia Americana: a popular dictionary of arts, sciences, literature, history, politics and biography, Volum 2

Forside
 

Hva folk mener - Skriv en omtale

Vi har ikke funnet noen omtaler på noen av de vanlige stedene.

Andre utgaver - Vis alle

Vanlige uttrykk og setninger

Populære avsnitt

Side 327 - Latin latro) is defined to be a breaking and entering the mansion-house of another, in the night, with intent to commit some felony within the same, whether such felonious intent be executed or not.
Side 179 - It is about a mile in length, and a quarter of a mile in breadth, but contracts at both ends.
Side 106 - And they do claim, demand and insist upon all and singular the premises as their undoubted rights and liberties...
Side 2 - Co. of the said district, have deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof they claim as proprietors, in the words following, to wit : " Tadeuskund, the Last King of the Lenape. An Historical Tale." In conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States...
Side 144 - About this time it was much the fashion for several ladies to have evening assemblies, where the fair sex might participate in conversation with literary and ingenious men, animated by a desire to please.
Side 200 - They were in his carriage, which was taken in that battle, and was shown publicly at London. He intended to have returned them to her. She lived, afterwards, Separated from her husband, at Rome, where she occupied part of the palace Borghese, and where she possessed, from 1816, the villa Sciarra. Her house, in which taste and love of the fine arts prevailed, was the centre of the most splendid society at Rome.
Side 528 - At the beginning of the revolution, he was captain in the corps of engineers. In 1791, he was appointed deputy to the constituent assembly, but at first took pan only in military affaire.
Side 475 - I much fear that this country (however earnestly she may endeavour to avoid it) could not in such case avoid seeing ranked under her banners all the restless and dissatisfied of any nation with which she might come in conflict. It is the contemplation of this new power, in any future war, which excites my most anxious apprehension. It is one thing to have a giant's strength, but it would be another to use it like a giant.
Side 182 - If this be all, the bond is called a single one, simplex obligatio; but there is generally a condition added, that if the obligor does some particular act, the obligation shall be void, or else shall remain in full force...
Side 251 - ... an hour, he will as completely fulfil his duty to his own and future generations as the native of our less temperate climate can do by ploughing in the cold winter, and reaping in the summer's heat, as often as these seasons return...

Bibliografisk informasjon