The Historiography of Psychoanalysis

Forside
Transaction Publishers, 1992 - 480 sider

Today Sigmund Freud's legacy seems as hotly contested as ever. He continues to attract fanaticism of one kind or another. If Freud might be disappointed at the failure of his successors to confirm many of his so-called discoveries he would be gratified by the transforming impact of his ideas in contemporary moral and ethical thinking. To move from the history of psychoanalysis onto the more neutral ground of scholarly inquiry is not a simple task. There is still little effort to study Freud and his followers within the context of intellectual history. Yet in an era when psychiatry appears to be going in a different direction from that charted by Freud, his basic point of view still attracts newcomers in areas of the world relatively untouched by psychoanalytic influence in the past. It is all the more important to clarify the strengths and the limitations of Freud's approach.

Roazen begins by delving into the personality of Freud, and reassesses his own earlier volume, Freud and His Followers. He then examines "Freud Studies" in the nature of Freudian appraisals and patients. He examines a succession of letters between Freud and Silberstein; Freud and Jones; Anna Freud and Eva Rosenfeld; James Strachey and Rupert Brooke. Roazen includes a series of interviews with such personages as Michael Balint, Philip Sarasin, Donald W. Winnicott, and Franz Jung. He explores curious relationships concerning Lou Andreas-Salome, Tola Rank, and Felix Deutsch, and deals with biographies of Freud's predecessors, Charcot and Breuer, and contemporaries including Menninger, Erikson, Helene Deutsch, and a number of followers. Freud's national reception in such countries as Russia, America, France, among others is examined, and Roazen surveys the literature relating to the history of psychoanalysis. Finally, he brings to light new documents offering fresh interpretations and valuable bits of new historical evidence.

This brilliantly constructed book explores the vagaries of Freud's impact over the twentieth century, including current controversial issues related to placing Freud and his theories within the historiography of psychoanalysis. It will be of interest to psychoanalysts, intellectual historians, and those interested in the history of ideas.

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Innhold

Introduction 1
21
A Reconsideration of Freud and His Followers
37
Introduction to Part 2
55
What is a Fact? Eva Rosenfeld
83
Introduction to Part 3
103
FreudFerenczi
125
Heinz Kohut
141
Michael Balint
155
Russia
311
40 America
317
41 France
333
Argentina
339
Great Britain
343
Intellectual History
353
Introduction to Part 8
355
The History of Psychiatry
357

Donald W Winnicott
173
Neglected Stories
191
Introduction to Part 5
193
Freud Lou AndreasSalome and Victor Tausk
195
Tola Rank
205
20 Felix Deutsch and the FBI
217
Part 6 Biographies Introduction to Part 6
231
21 Charcot
233
Breuer
237
WagnerJauregg
241
Sigmund Freud
245
Jung
251
26 Sabina Spielrein
255
Murray
257
Christiana Morgan
263
Menninger
267
Karen Homey
273
31 Dorothy Burlingham
277
Anna Freud
283
Deutsch Klein Homey Anna Freud
287
Erikson
291
Winnicott
295
36 Khan
297
Bettelheim
301
Skinner
305
National Receptions of Freud
307
Introduction to Part 7
309
Dora
363
Schreber
371
Unorthodox Technique
377
The Freud Wars
379
The Case of Sigmund Freud
381
Reading Freuds Reading
385
Otto Rank
387
Oedipus
393
The Psychoanalytic Vocation
395
Freud Reappraised
399
The Clark Lectures
403
Why Freud Was Wrong
405
Translating Freud
409
Freuds Discourse
411
Moses
415
Confrontation in Vienna
419
Freuds Answer
421
New Documents
425
Introduction to Part 9
427
Freud Without Hindsight
429
The Diary
435
Felix Deutschs Letters
441
Freuds Will
447
A Bibliography of Paul Roazen Since 1988
453
Index
465
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