The European Magazine, and London Review, Volum 82

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Philological Society of London, 1822
 

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Side 497 - Looking tranquillity ! It strikes an awe And terror on my aching sight ; the tombs And monumental caves of death look cold, And shoot a chillness to my trembling heart. Give me thy hand, and let me hear thy voice; Nay, quickly speak to me, and let me hear Thy voice — my own affrights me with its echoes.
Side 511 - What though the field be lost? All is not lost — the unconquerable will, And study of revenge, immortal hate. And courage never to submit or yield: And what is else not to be overcome.
Side 30 - But me, not destined such delights to share, My prime of life in wandering spent and care ; Impell'd, with steps unceasing, to pursue Some fleeting good, that mocks me with the view ; That, like the circle bounding earth and skies, Allures from far, yet, as I follow, flies ; My fortune leads to traverse realms alone, And find no spot of all the world my own.
Side 69 - Not distant far from thence a murmuring sound Of waters issued from a cave and spread Into a liquid plain then stood unmoved Pure as the expanse of heaven I thither went With unexperienced thought and laid me down On the green bank to look into the clear Smooth lake that to me seemed another sky.
Side 531 - ... better which was already good, nor often to mend what he must have known to be faulty. He wrote, as he tells us, with very little consideration ; when occasion or necessity called upon him, he poured out what the present moment happened to supply, and, when once it had passed the press, ejected it from his mind ; for, when he had no pecuniary interest, he had no further solicitude.
Side 512 - Then ye shall answer them, That the waters of Jordan were cut off before the ark of the covenant of the LORD; when it passed over Jordan, the waters of Jordan were cut off: and these stones shall be for a memorial unto the children of Israel for ever.
Side 511 - Extort from me. To bow and sue for grace With suppliant knee, and deify his power, Who from the terror of this arm so late Doubted his empire; that were low indeed, That were an ignominy, and shame beneath This downfall ; since, by fate, the strength of Gods And this empyreal substance cannot fail...
Side 48 - If the father of criticism has rightly denominated poetry, " an imitative art," these writers will, without great wrong, lose their right to the name of poets ; for they cannot be said to have imitated any thing: they neither copied nature nor life; neither painted the forms of matter, nor represented the operations of intellect.
Side 511 - Oh, thou beautiful And unimaginable ether ! and Ye multiplying masses of increased And still increasing lights ! what are ye ? what Is this blue wilderness of interminable Air, where ye roll along, as I have seen The leaves along the limpid streams of Eden ? Is your course measured for ye ? Or do ye Sweep on in your unbounded revelry Through an aerial universe of endless Expansion — at which my soul aches to think — Intoxicated with eternity...
Side 58 - ... rising from her reeking hide; a wall-eyed horse, tired of the loneliness of the stable, was poking his spectral head out of a window, with the rain dripping on it from the eaves; an unhappy cur, chained to a doghouse hard by, uttered something every now and then, between a bark and a yelp; a drab of a...

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