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to return to your home and try to think no odd ways—an assertion which gave his more of it. Trust to me I will manage the mother, Nurse Lynch, something to think affair for you. A word of what has occurred about, She alone suspected the cause of here to-day must not escape your lips. Mind, Miss Barrington's altered looks or guessed Lady Trevor and Sir Gerard must know the subject of that conversation in the nothing of it. They might be more scrupu- ruins of St. Bride. lous than we are, you know," he added with Very anxiously did Eva await the proma hard short laugh.

ised visit from Mr. Crofton the following The words and the ring of that laugh day. He came ostensibly on business, but thrilled the haughty girl with indignation. secretly by appointment, to let her know the Mr. Crofton saw the gleam of anger in her result of his expected interview with Dinah averted eye and it warned him to be more at Elm Lodge. guarded. He must humour her pride, he “ You have nothing to fear from her !” he thought, which he saw would brook no said, with an encouraging smile, "the wofamiliarity; the habits of years could not man is very ill and her death will soon rebe conquered so soon even in her bitter lieve you from all anxiety." humiliation. She looked upon herself still A cruel joy flashed across Eva's pale face as the mistress of Barrington House and at the prospect of this woman's death who demanded all the respectful deference called herself her grandmother ; but then she had hitherto received from him. came the recollection that the secret would The time would come when feeling herself not die with her, and the sudden gleam of entirely in his power she might be a little happiness vanished. humbler.

“Where is she?" she asked eagerly. Eva now gathered herself up from the

“In
my

house. She came to it last night grassy mound where she had been sitting more dead than alive, so anxious was she to and prepared to leave the ruins. Mr. keep her appointment and have the matter Crofton walking respectfully at her side. settled before she died. She made a depoThe aspect of nature was still bright and sition before me, as a magistrate, and bejoyous, but in her crushed heart was no lives that I will see Miss Dormer restored to answering response. A gloom had fallen her rightful inheritance." upon her spirits. How painfully did she There was a grim smile playing over Mr. realize the truth of that saying, “we know Crofton's hard, deeply-lined face, as he not what a day will bring forth.” She left spoke. Eva looked up at him with a wisther home that morning gay and happy with ful gleam in her grey eyes; he understood out a care she returned to it stricken, hum- that questioning, anxious gaze, and anbled beneath the terrible discovey she had swered hastily: made, the recollection of which must darken “Of course I mean to do nothing of the her days even if this fatal secret could be kind. Your interests are dearer to me than concealed. She pleaded illness to Lady those of a stranger. I think it would be a Trevor to account for her pallid gloomy cruel thing to deprive you of what you have face, and thoughtful depressed manner; for so long possessed, just because you do not in spite of all her efforts she could not help happen to have a legitimate right to it. showing something of the fearful effects her You are the oldest, by a few hours, of Malate passionate excitement had caused her.jor Barrington's daughters, although that

groom, Maurice, declared that the half-claim would never hold good in a court of mad woman Dinah Blake had frightened law in consequence of your illegitimacy. his young mistress almost to death with her. But no one need know anything of that ;

The

your half-sister will not miss what she never asked, after a short silence, as Mr. Crofton possessed."

rose to take his leave. “Who has the charge of Dinah Blake ? “I am sure of it. She has had a low Is there any danger of her talking about nervous fever, and is reduced to a very weak this painful affair to any one who might cir- state. You have nothing more to fear from culate the story?"

her.” “Not the least !” was the prompt answer “She has done me all the injury she could of Mr. Crofton. “Last night when she was in revealing the shameful secret,” said Eva, too ill to leave my house I committed her to bitterly; "I wish to Heaven she had died the care of my sister, a sensible, elderly wo- first !” she added, with fierce vehemence. man who manages my domestic affairs. “Remember that it is only known to She will take care that no person has access those who will keep it,” remarked Mr. Crofto her, but herself.”

ton sympathetically. “But the secret will be known to her “ But can I rely on their silence?" was also," was Eva's hasty observation, with a her gloomy rejoinder. troubled look.

“Undoubtedly! As long as you make it “ That is unavoidable, but there is no their interest to keep the secret,” he ancause for alarm on that account, she can be swered, emphatically. induced to keep it,” said Mr. Crofton, with “I understand," she said, quietly, but a significant smile.

with an angry, disdainful smile. “ I understand her silence must be And thus the interview terminated. By bought?” said Eva, with some of her usual degrees Eva recovered something of her hauteur.

former cheerfulness, as the dreaded evil was “ Exactly so !" was the cool rejoin- for the present swept from her path. She der, “my sister is poor and dependent waited daily in expectation of the death of on me, and would not care to lend her- Dinah, but the old woman still lingered. Mr. self to an act of villainy without a consider-Crofton said, “ If she were only out of the ation."

way, Eva would feel less anxiety, for she "An act of villainy !" How the words, feared that she could not be bribed to revealing the naked truth, grated in the girl's silence, like the mercenary agent and his ears. The deep flush of shame crimsoned sister. She had told her grand-daughter in her brow, and an angry light flashed from that interview in the ruins, that she wanted her eyes, but she said not a word. She was none of her money ; that she only wished completely in the power of this man and his to do justice to the girl she had wronged. sister, and pride forbade her to free herself Unless Dinah Blake died, therefore, the from the bondage they were about to impose exposé Eva would have done anything to upon her. Anything was preferable to avoid, might still be made, and the threathaving the finger of scorn pointed at her-ened storm burst upon her devoted head. to seeing herself dragged down from the It was a fearful trial for the proud girl to high position she had hitherto occupied and bear alone—this secret agony of dread—and humbled in the dust. Any suffering—any to have to maintain an outward composure, unprincipled act—almost any crime before so as not to excite remarks. Her life was that! Eva Barrington inherited much of blighted; never again could she be the gay, her despised grandmother's strength of light-hearted being she had once been. In character. She had also her proud, pas- her anguish she often wished for death, for sionate determined nature.

when happiness is withdrawn from our life, “Is the woman really near death ?” she lit does not seem worth possessing. Life, especially to the young, without happiness, itance-could have given her back some is a living death. Poor Eva ! she was suf- peace of mind; but that her indomitable fering for the sins of others; one act alone, pride forbade her to do. the restoring to Josephine her lawful inher

( To be continued.)

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What were the voices the still lakes heard ?

What were the scenes that the forest saw ? What was the life that the green leaves stirred ?

Who were the subjects to nature's law? They were the voices of nature's ownBirds and beasts, and herself alone.

The rapid chatter of chipmunk small,

Springing ever amongst the leaves ;
The blue-winged jay with its constant call;

And creaking of boughs as they felt the breeze;
Woodpeckers tapping with iron beak
Dead pine trunks, for the worm they seek.

The human cry of the mocking loon

Ever rose from the lake's dark wave;
The partridge drummed, and the ringed racoon

Sought his prey like a crafty knave.
Wolf, and fox, and muskrat grey,
Lived their lives and passed away.

The forest deer, with russet hide,

Hart, and hind, and tender fawn,
Beat their tracks to the bright lake-side,

Drinking there in the early dawn,
And the tawny lynx, in the tall, rank grass,
Quiet crouched till the herd should pass.

The green snake slipt through the moss-bound fern,

The black snake reared his fearless head, As the wild cat crept to the quiet burn,

Or the dark, brown bear with his heavy tread ; Whilst on some steep rock's savage crest The eagle made her cruel nest.

The speckled trout, and the white-fish leapt,

Where bull-frogs croak, and the wild ducks Ay ; The monster sturgeon quiet slept

Beneath the glow of a mirrored sky;
And the ceaseless hum of mosquitos' wings
Rose below all other things.

Now, sound of axes fills the wood,

The blue smoke curls above the leaves,
The grass now grows where the hemlock stood,

And the golden corn lies bound in sheaves;
And where the beavers built their dams
Come the low of cattle, and bleat of lambs.

And stately halls and temples stand

And homes are raised, and cities filled ;
The Red-skin fades from off the land,

And nature's myriad voice is stilled :
The Pale-face rears resistless head.
The Present lives, the Past is dead.

TORONTO.

MY FIRST CARIBOO.

BY HUBERT HUMBER.

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OOKING northward from Quebec one ! These words were spoken to me by my

sees a range of low mountains ex- Indian hunter, Michel, as I sat looking very tending all along the north shore of the St. ruefully at the carcass of a huge bull moose Lawrence away to Anticosti, and behind this which lay before me half buried in the range of hills for hundreds of miles lies a snow; and when Michel added, "no get wild land of mountain, lake and river--the cariboo easy like dat," I resolved that my home of the moose and cariboo deer. The last shot had been fired at moose, and that cariboo, unlike the moose, is a great run- the next season it was too late that yearDer, seldom staying long in one place ; and, I would try my hand at cariboo : so a few þeing very wary, and of prodigious powers days after, when parting with Michel at the sí endurance, even after receiving a mortal village, I made a compact with him that Found, its pursuit is justly considered the when the time came we should hunt cariboo most exciting of all our Canadian sports. together. When the cold of early winter has driven The summer had come and passed; the the deer from their far northern haunts into fall snipe shooting was over ; the long arrowthe mountains in the immediate vicinity of shaped flocks of wild geese had passed with Quebec, there are always to be found those noisy flight to the southward, and the long who are willing to encounter the privations Canadian winter was setting in with great seand dangers of that inhospitable region for verity when I sent word to Michel to come the chance of a successful stalk after such in and see me. We met, and the result was

an engagement to start on the 15th of De"Cariboo not like moose, no for sure." cember, and a specific estimate of our wants •

moble game.

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