Select British Classics, Volum 10

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J. Conrad, 1803
 

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Side 184 - Statesman \ yet friend to Truth! of soul sincere, ' In action faithful, and in honour clear ; 'Who broke no promise, serv'd no private end, 'Who gain'd no title, and who lost no friend ; 'Ennobled by himself, by all approv'd, 'And prais'd, unenvy'd, by the Muse he lov'd.
Side 82 - Achilles' wrath, to Greece the direful spring Of woes unnumber'd, heavenly Goddess sing, The wrath which hurl'd to Pluto's gloomy reign The souls of mighty chiefs untimely slain.
Side 98 - The Italian, attends only to the invariable, the great and general ; ideas which are fixed and inherent in universal nature; the Dutch, on the contrary, to literal truth and a minute exactness in the detail, as I may say, of nature modified by accident. The attention to these petty peculiarities is the very cause of this naturalness so much admired in the Dutch pictures, which, if we suppose it to be a beauty, is certainly...
Side 183 - To this sad shrine, whoe'er thou art, draw near, Here lies the friend most loved, the son most dear ; Who ne'er knew joy, but friendship might divide, Or gave his father grief but when he died.
Side 89 - It may appear strange, perhaps, to hear this sense of the rule disputed ; but it must be considered, that, if the excellency of a painter consisted only in this kind of imitation, painting must lose its rank, and be no longer considered as a liberal art, and sister to poetry, this imitation being merely mechanical, in which the slowest intellect is always sure to succeed best...
Side 186 - On Mrs. Corbet, who died of a Cancer in her Breast. ' Here rests a woman, good without pretence, Blest with plain reason, and with sober sense ; No conquest she, but o'er herself desir'd ; No arts essay'd, but not to be admir'd. Passion and pride were to her soul unknown, Convinc'd that Virtue only is our own.
Side 187 - Pensive hast follow'd to the silent tomb, Steer'd the same course to the same quiet shore, Not parted long, and now to part no more ! Go, then, where only bliss sincere is known! Go, where to love and to enjoy are one ! Yet take these tears, Mortality's relief, And, till we share your joys, forgive our grief: These little rites, a stone, a verse receive, Tis all a father, all a friend can give...
Side 106 - NOVEMBER 24, 1759. .BIOGRAPHY is, of the various kinds of narrative writing, that which is most eagerly read, and most easily applied to the purposes of life.
Side 191 - Unblam'd through life, lamented in thy end ; These are thy honours ! not that here thy bust Is mix'd with heroes, or with kings thy dust ; But that the worthy and the good shall say, Striking their pensive bosoms — Here lies Gay...
Side 92 - That every day has its pains and sorrows is universally experienced, and almost universally confessed; but let us not attend only to mournful truths; if we look impartially about us, we shall find that every day has likewise its pleasures and its joys.

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