Erikson, Eskimos, and Columbus: Medieval European Knowledge of America

Forside
JHU Press, 21. apr. 2002 - 342 sider

How did medieval Europeans have such specific geographic knowledge of North America, a land even their most daring adventurers had not yet discovered? In Erikson, Eskimos, and Columbus, James Robert Enterline presents new evidence that traces this knowledge to the cartographic skills of indigenous people of the high Arctic, who, he contends, provided the basis for medieval maps of large parts of North America. Drawing on an exhaustive chronological survey of pre-Columbian maps, including the controversial Yale Vinland Map, this book boldly challenges conventional accounts of Europe's discovery of the New World.

 

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Innhold

Claudius Clavus
31
The Inventio Fortunatae and Martin Behaim
49
The Yale Vinland Map
61
Introduction to the Chronological Survey
73
Early Scandinavian Geography
83
Communication Links with Greenland
97
The Unseen Bridge
113
Late GreenlandBased Exploration
135
IS An Old Continent Emerges
252
The Misunderstandings Are Resolved
277
Conclusion
291
The Vinland Maps Ink
305
Notes
311
Selected Bibliography
329
Index
335
Opphavsrett

A New Continent Emerges
231

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Om forfatteren (2002)

James Robert Enterline is a mathematician and computer consultant who is well known for his work in the history of cartography. He is the author of Viking America.

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