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"Sanitation of Public Buildings,” by William Paul Gerhard, C. E., New

York City. Discussion: S. W. Butterfield, Weathersfield; C. B. Kent, Dorset;

Prof. D. B. Locke, Superintendent of Schools, Rutland.

TUESDAY EVENING, JUNE 30, 8.00 O'CLOCK.

"Advanced and Simplified Plumbing," with lantern slides, by William Paul

Gerhard, C. E. Discussion: Henry Tucker, M. D., Brattleboro; H. L. Townshend,

M. D., Bridport.

WEDNESDAY MORNING, JULY 1, 9.30 O'CLOCK.

"Bovine Tuberculosis, Relative to the Effect on the Human Subject,” by

V. A. Moore, V. S., Ithaca, N. Y. Discussion : H. D. Chadwick, M. D., Superintendent Vermont Sani

tarium, Pittsford; C. W. Peck, M. D., Brandon; W. N. Bryant,

M. D., Ludlow. "Ideal Dairying and Ideal Milk," by Charles Harrington, M. D., Secretary

Massachusetts State Board of Health, Boston. Discussion: L. P. Sprague, M. D., Food Chemist, Laboratory of Hy

giene, Burlington; Prof. J. L. Hills, Experiment Station, University of Vermont; A. Morton, M. D., St. Albans.

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON, JULY 1, 2.00 O'CLOCK.

"Slaughter Houses and Meat Inspection," by R. O. Brock, V. S., United

States Inspector. Discussion: C. F. Ball, M. D., and; W. H. Ranks, M. D., Shel

burne; James Haylett, M. D., Mooretown. "Practical Phases of Laboratory Work,” by B. H. Stone, Director of the

Laboratory of Hygiene, Burlington.
Discussion: C. F. Dalton, M. D., Burlington; F. H. Palmer, Esq.,

Bristol; Thomas H. Hack, M. D., Proctor.

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WEDNESDAY EVENING, JULY 1, 8.00 O'CLOCK.

"The Nature and Control of Bovine Tuberculosis," with lantern slides,

by V. A. Moore, V. S., Ithaca, N. Y. Discussion: Prof. C. L. Beach, Burlington; H. S. Wilson, Cattle Com

missioner for Vermont, Arlington; George Aitken, ex-Secretary of the Board of Agriculture, Woodstock; F. L. Davis, Secretary of the Board of Agriculture, North Pomfret.

THURSDAY MORNING, JULY 2, 9.00 O'CLOCK.

"Health Laws," with Question Box, by Hon. Benjamin Gates, State's

Attorney for Washington County. Discussion: H. L. Manchester, M. D., Pawlet; Hon. A. A. Butter

field, Jacksonville; George B. Hulburd, M, D., Jericho.

Act No. 90, OF LAWS OF 1900, AUTHORIZES THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A SCHOOL

OF INSTRUCTION FOR HEALTH OFFICERS OF THE STATE.

In accordance with the provision of this law the Tenth Annual School for the Health Officers of the State will be held in Armory Hall, Burlington, opening Monday evening, June 29, at eight o'clock. All health officers of the state are hereby notified and called to be present on that date to attend the sessions of said School. Only in case of his sickness will any health officer be excused for non-attendance; such excuse must be filed with the Secretary. Per order of the State Board of Health

Henry D. HOLTON, Secretary.

This School is held for the purpose of giving instruction to health officers.

Every member of a local health board should register immediately on arrival.

The public are invited to be present, as every citizen will be equally interested and instructed.

Arrangements will be made with the railroads of the state to give convention rates to all those attending the School.

The selectmen, with the local health officer of every town, constitute the local board of health. The selectmen are especially urged to be present.

The Laboratory of Hygiene, 196 Main Street, will, as usual, be open at all times to visiting health officials, and all are expected to make free use of the Laboratory rooms.

A register of the School will be open at the Armory, where hand baggage and overcoats may be checked at any time. Those who wish board in private families will find there a list of boarding houses.

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Entered October 21, 1901, as second-class matter, Post Office at Brattleboro, Vt.,

under act of Congress of July 16, 1894.

CONTENTS:

Address at Opening of School for Health Officers, June 29, 1908, by Charles S.

Caverly, M. D. President State Board of Health. Page 3.
Address by Governor F. D. Proctor. Page 6.
Address by Hon. W. J. Bigelow, Mayor of Burlington. Page 8.
Address by Judge Edward C. Mower. Page 10.
Slaughter-House and Meat Inspection, by R. O. Brock, V. S., United States

Inspector. Page 18.
Ideal Dairying and Ideal Milk, by Charles Harrington, M. D., Secretary Massachu-

setts State Board of Health. Page 33.
Report of Examinations at the State Laboratory. Page 46.
News Items. Page 63.

BRATTLEBORO, VT.

JUNE 29, 1908.

BY CHARLES S. CAVERLY, M. D., PRESIDENT STATE BOARD OF HEALTH.

.

Concerted work for the public health in Vermont, with modern facilities, dates back ten years. The State Board of Health—with powers more or less advisory simply—is twelve years older.

The legislature of 1898 established a "State Bacteriological Laboratory," to quote the Act, "for the chemical and bacteriological examination of water supplies, milk and food products, and the examination of cases and suspected cases of diphtheria, typhoid fever, tuberculosis, malaria and other infectious and contagious diseases."

The language of this statute was specific in respect to the purposes for which the Laboratory was founded, and it further specified that its use was to be free to the people of Vermont. Certain definite objects were in view, looking to the betterment of health conditions here, and the Laboratory was designed to benefit all the people. It is perhaps impossible at this time to measure the full significance of this law, or to estimate the effect it has had on our people. If its success can be gauged by the amount of work it has turned out, by the character of that work, or by the number of those who have used it, the legislature of 1898 acted wisely.

The Laboratory has surely made a place for itself among our state institutions, and we believe it is filling that place in a creditable manner. It has done the work it was set to do. It has examined our water supplies, milk and other food products, cases and suspected cases of contagious disease, and it has done more of these examinations with each succeeding year.

The Laboratory, designed for hygienic work alone, has had its work and responsibilities increased by succeeding legislatures, and it is now not only a laboratory of hygiene, but a general chemical and pathological laboratory for the state.

As a factor in official and practical sanitation, the Laboratory is now everywhere recognized as a prime necessity. Our Vermont Laboratory, a pioneer in state laboratories, has served a most useful purpose along all the lines intended by its early advocates, and has reflected credit upon the state.

It is not my purpose, however, to laud the Laboratory. This is unnecessary here at home.

This Health Officers' School and the Vermont State Laboratory of Hygiene are twin institutions. The same movement for better health conditions here produced both. he School came with the Laboratory: the one was planned to give force and direction to the other. The suggestion of the School came from a desire to widen and increase the use of the

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