Alcohol in Africa: Mixing Business, Pleasure, and Politics

Forside
Deborah Fahy Bryceson
Greenwood Publishing Group, Incorporated, 2002 - 305 sider

Alcohol in Sub-Saharan Africa has historically been a conduit for religious and political expression controlled by male elders. Over the past century and especially during the last two crisis-ridden decades, alcohol's ceremonial role has been largely displaced. Rapid income differentiation and economic marginalization have spurred production and consumption of alcohol. In many localities, expanding supply has led to drinking patterns that impinge on general social welfare. These circumstances coincide with the continent-wide implementation of structural adjustment and economic liberalization policies. One might ask, have those policies driven people to drink?

Currently, alcohol is a taboo subject for donors and African governments alike, yet it is at the nexus of many of the continent's most pressing problems. Agricultural sector decline, large-scale labor redundancy, household instability, and AIDS have cause or effect linkages to changing alcohol usage. This edited collection explores the economic, political, and social meanings of alcohol usage. The material is contextualized within a review of existing anthropological, social history, and social welfare literature on alcohol, and a broad historical overview of the continental trends in alcohol production and consumption. Both the pleasure and the pain of alcohol usage emerge, providing insight into the ambiguity of alcohol in Africa today.

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Innhold

Changing Modalities of Alcohol Usage
23
For Women and Children An Economic History
55
Liquid Gold of a Lost Kingdom The Rise of Waragi
75
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Om forfatteren (2002)

DEBORAH FAHY BRYCESON is a Researcher at the African Studies Centre, Leiden University. She is a graduate of the University of Dar es Salaam and took her doctorate at Oxford.

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