The Bee,: Or Literary Weekly Intelligencer, Volum 3

James Anderson
Mundell and Son, Parliament Stairs, 1791
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Side 311 - Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing, more than any man in all Venice. His reasons are as two grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff : you shall seek all day ere you find them, and when you have them, they are not worth the search.
Side 97 - ... the foundations of our national policy will be laid in the pure and immutable principles of private morality ; and the pre-eminence of free government be exemplified by all the attributes which can win the affections of its citizens, and command the respect of the world.
Side 96 - No people can be bound to acknowledge and adore the invisible Hand which conducts the affairs of men, more than the people of the United States. Every step by which they have advanced to the character of an independent nation seems to have been distinguished by some token of providential agency...
Side 336 - Have pity upon me, have pity upon me, O ye my friends ; for the hand of God hath touched me.
Side 257 - I exhort therefore, that, first of all, supplications, prayers, intercessions, and giving of thanks, be made for all men; for kings, and for all that are in authority; that we may lead a quiet and peaceable life in all godliness and honesty.
Side 284 - At the desire of many of his friends, his body was carried into the chapel the day preceding the interment, and there lay in a kind of state becoming the person, dressed in his clerical habit, with gown, cassock, and band ; the old clerical cap on his head, a Bible in one hand, and a white handkerchief in the other.
Side 303 - Strange cozenage ! none would live past years again, Yet all hope pleasure in what yet remain, And from the dregs of life think to receive What the first sprightly running could not give. I'm tired of waiting for this chymic gold Which fools us young and beggars us when old.
Side 325 - A stately tree grew on the plain ; its branches were covered with verdure ; its boughs spread wide, and made a goodly shadow ; the trunk was like a strong pillar ; the roots were like crooked fangs.
Side 323 - This is my story, — now to the prayer of my petition. I never before envied you the possession of the Orkneys, which I now do only to provide for this eloquent innocent apostle. The sun has refused your barren...
Side xxxvi - And that, knowing the time, that now it is high time to awake out of fleep ; for now is our falvation nearer than when we believed. The night is far fpent, the day is at hand ; let us therefore caft off the works of darknefs, and let us put on the armour of light.

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