The History of Drink: A Review, Social, Scientific, and Political

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Trübner & Company, 1878 - 288 sider
 

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Side 67 - Who hath woe ? who hath sorrow ? who hath contentions? who hath babbling? who hath wounds without cause ? who hath redness of eyes ? They that tarry long at the wine ; they that go to seek mixed wine.
Side 70 - Let not him that eateth despise him that eateth not; and let not him which eateth not judge him that eateth : for God hath received him.
Side 69 - When the ruler of the feast had tasted the water that was made wine, and knew not whence it was: (but the servants which drew the water knew ;) the governor of the feast...
Side 152 - The entertainment and show went forward, and most of the presenters went backward, or fell down; wine did so occupy their upper chambers.
Side 152 - I am certain she was not joined with good works, and left the Court in a staggering condition; Charity came to the King's feet, and seemed to cover the multitude of sins her sisters had committed; in some...
Side 70 - A bishop then must be blameless, the husband of one wife, vigilant, sober, of good behaviour, given to hospitality, apt to teach; not given to wine, no striker, not greedy of filthy lucre; but patient, not a brawler, not covetous; one that ruleth well his own house, having his children in subjection with all gravity...
Side 70 - It is good neither to eat flesh nor to drink wine, nor anything whereby thy brother stumbleth or is offended or is made weak.
Side 151 - His Majesty then got up and would dance with the Queen of Sheba, but he fell down and humbled himself before her and was carried to an inner chamber and laid on a bed of state, which was not a little defiled with the presents of the Queen which had been bestowed on his garments, such as wine, cream, jelly, beverage, cakes, spices, and other good matters.
Side 151 - I think the Dane hath strangely wrought on our good English nobles ; for those whom I never could get to taste good liquor, now follow the fashion and wallow in beastly delights. The ladies abandon their sobriety, and are seen to roll about in intoxication.
Side 68 - For John the Baptist came neither eating bread nor drinking wine; and ye say, He hath a devil. The Son of man is come eating and drinking; and ye say, Behold a gluttonous man, and a winebibber, a friend of publicans and sinners!

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