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ENGLISH GRAMMAR

SIMPLIFIED;

DESIGNED

TO FACILITATE THE STUDY OF THE

ENGLISH LANGUAGE;

COMPREHENDING TAR

PRINCIPLES AND RULES OF ENGLISH GRAMMAR

ILLUSTRATED BY

APPROPRIATE EXERCISES ;

TO WHICH

IS ADDED A SERIES

OF

QUESTIONS FOR EXAMINATION.

ABRIDGED

FOR THE USE OF SCHOOLS.

BY ALLEN FISK,
Author of Adam's Latin Grammar Simplified.

principles of knowledge become most intelligible to young persons, when they are explained ulcated by practical illustration and direction.

MURRAY.

TROY, N. Y.
PUBLISHED AND SOLD BY 2. CLARK.
SOLD ALSO BY H. STOCKWELL AND F. ADANCOURT.

Printed by Francis Adapcourt.

THE NEW YORK
PUBLIC LIBRARY
5416371

ASTOR, LESOX AND
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS

R 1950 L

NORTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW-YORK, TO WIT :

BE IT REMEMBERED, that' on the twenty-fifth day of May, in the forly (L. S.) sixth year of the Independence of the United States of America, A. I

1822, Allen Fisk, of the said district, has deposited in this office the title « a book the right whereof he claims as author, in the words following, to wit :

Murray?: English Grammar Simplified ; designed to facilitate the study of the Englis language ; comprehending the principles and rnles of English grammar, illustrated h appropriate exercises; to which is adried a series of questions for examination. Abrid ed for the use of schools. By Allen Fisk, author of Adam's Latin grammar, simplifier

The principles of knowledge become piost intelligible to young persons when they ai explained and inculcated by practical illustration and direction.

Murray. Io conformity to the act of the Congress of the United States, entitled “ An act for th encouragement of learning, hy securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to th authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned";" and also to the act entitled “ An act supplementary to an act entitled An act for the encouragi ment of learning, hy securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the author and proprietors of such copies during the times therin mentioned,' and extending the h pefits thereof to the arts of Designing, Engraving and Etching historical and other print

RICHARD R. LANSING, Clerk of the

Northern District of New York,

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INTRODUCTION.

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JINDLEY MURRAY's English Grammar has been so long an iomate of OUT cademies and schools of almost every grade, that its merits are familiar to all. has stood the test of criticism, and been pronounced by the best judges, both this country and in Great Britain, the most complete English grammar ex. nl. Todeed it is generally allowed, that Mr. Murray has done more to eluci. ite the principles of our language, and to fix our grammar on its goly just uodation; the established practice of our best speakers and writers, than any her grammarian whatever. His grammar is therefore justly considered a andard work, whose authority may be appealed to with safety, on doubisul or sputed points. But it were roog to jofer that, because Murray's grammar is a work of eat and acknowledged excellence, it is therefore perfect and incapable of fur2r improvement. Such a principle would have precluded us from tbe benefit er . en of Mr. Murray's labours. He has made great improvement in the works his predecessors; and his successors will doubtless find room for some im. ovement in his work. Jo fact it seems to be generally conceded, at the preso 1 day, that, in point of atrangeaient at least, the work in question is not so :11 adapted to the use of schools and the comprehension of juvenile miods, as night be. The author's plan, when properly carried iglo effect; was no doubt ood one. Io his “General Directions for using the Exercises,” he says, “ As po as the learner las committed to memory the definitions of the article and ostantive, as expressed in the grammar, he should be employed in parsing ose parts of speech, as they are arranged in the exercises. The learner vuld proceed in this manner, through all the definitions contained in Etynioy, regularly parsing the exercises on one definition before he applies to aner.” This plan, though excelleot in its general design, is yet defective, id as ch as it subjects the student to the task of committiog tbe definitions to me. sy before he uoderstands them, and as it postpones entirely the study of Syotill that of Etymology has been completed. Aod besides, the grammar and rcises - being in separate books, it has unfortunately happened that the her, especially the abridgment, has found its way into a great many ols, where the latter are

In defect of these, tbe student's ence has often been exhausted in committing the grammar, perhaps repeat, to memory with no apparent design or advantage ; and his courage disei biġ inaking his first essay in parsing, in promiscuous exercises ;~~as is a in arittimetic should first commit to memory all the rules and definitions in

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