The Spectator, Volum 15

Forside
Alexander Chalmers
E. Sargeant, M. & W. Ward, Munroe, Francis & Parker, and Edward Cotton, Boston, 1810

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Side 261 - It must be so — Plato, thou reasonest well ; Else whence this pleasing hope, this fond desire, This longing after immortality ? Or whence this secret dread, and inward horror, Of falling into nought ? Why shrinks the soul Back on herself, and startles at destruction ? Tis the divinity that stirs within us ; 'Tis heaven itself, that points out an hereafter, And intimates eternity to man ! Eternity ! thou pleasing, dreadful thought ! Through what variety of untried being, Through what new scenes...
Side 27 - I have sinned ; what shall I do unto thee, O thou preserver of men? Why hast thou set me as a mark against thee, So that I am a burden to myself?
Side 81 - Thou comest to me with a sword, and with a spear, and with a shield; but I come to thee in the name of the Lord of hosts, the God of the armies of Israel, whom thou hast defied.
Side 244 - I have been in the deep ; in journeyings often, in perils of waters, in perils of robbers, in perils by mine own countrymen, in perils by the heathen, in perils in the city, in perils in the wilderness, in perils in the sea, in perils among false brethren ; in weariness and painfulness, in watchings often, in hunger and thirst, in fastings often, in cold and nakedness.
Side 50 - I might say of only a day or an hour, and miserable to all eternity; or, on the contrary, miserable for this short term of years, and happy for a whole eternity : what words are sufficient to express that folly and want of consideration which in such a case makes a wrong choice ? I here put the case even at the worst, by supposing, what seldom happens, that a course of virtue makes us miserable in this life : but if we suppose, as it generally happens, that virtue would make us more happy even in...
Side 261 - If there's a power above us (And that there is, all Nature cries aloud Through all her works), he must delight in virtue ; And that which he delights in must be happy. But when, or where ? — This world was made for Caesar.
Side 49 - ... and of the great distance of that second duration which is to succeed it. The mind, I say, might give itself up to that happiness which is at hand, considering that it is so very near, and that it would last so very long. But when the choice we actually have before us is this, Whether we will...
Side 261 - The stars shall fade away, the sun himself Grow dim with age, and Nature sink in years, But thou shalt flourish in immortal youth, Unhurt amidst the war of elements, The wreck of matter, and the crush of worlds.
Side 121 - Momus is said to be the son of Nox and Somnus, of darkness and sleep. Idle men who have not been at the pains to accomplish or distinguish themselves, are very apt to detract from others ; as ignorant men are very subject to decry those beauties in a celebrated work which they have not eyes to discover.
Side 48 - ... punishment, and enjoined to pursue our pleasures under pain of damnation ? He would certainly imagine that we were influenced by a scheme of duties quite opposite to those which are indeed prescribed to us. And truly, according to such an imagination, he must conclude that we are a species of...

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