Major-General Sir Thomas Munro, Governor of Madras: Selections from His Minutes and Other Official Writings, Volum 2

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Side 329 - We should look upon India not as a temporary possession, but as one which is to be maintained permanently, until the natives shall in some future age have abandoned most of their superstitions and prejudices, and become sufficiently enlightened to frame a regular government for themselves, and to conduct and preserve it.
Side 289 - A free press and the dominion of strangers are things which are quite incompatible, and which cannot long exist together ; for what is the first duty of a free press ? it is to deliver the country from a foreign yoke, and to sacrifice to this one great object every measure and...
Side 328 - What is to be their final result on the character of the people ? Is it to be raised, or is it to l,e lowered? Are we to be satisfied with merely securing our power and protecting the inhabitants, leaving them to sink gradually in character lower than at present; or are we to endeavour to raise their character, and to render them worthy of filling higher situations in the management of their country, and of devising plans for its improvement...
Side v - MUNRO (Major-Gen. Sir Thomas) Bart. KCB, Governor of Madras. SELECTIONS FROM HIS MINUTES AND OTHER OFFICIAL WRITINGS. Edited, with an Introductory Memoir, by Sir ALEXANDER ARBUTHNOT, KCSI, CIE 2 vols.
Side 329 - Britain itself, at least as hopeless as it is here. When we reflect how much the character of nations has always been influenced by that of Governments, and that some, once the most cultivated, have sunk into barbarism, while others, formerly the rudest, have attained the highest point of...
Side 326 - ... This is true of nations as well as of individuals. To have no property scarcely degrades more in one case, than in the other to have property at the disposal of a foreign government in which we have no share. The enslaved nation loses the privileges of a nation, as the slave does that of a free man.
Side 323 - ... millions of inhabitants, no man but a European shall be entrusted with so much authority as to order the punishment of a single stroke of a rattan. Such an interdiction is to pass a sentence of degradation on a whole people, for which no benefit can ever compensate. There is no instance in the world of so humiliating a sentence having ever been passed upon any nation.
Side 239 - His dwelling is little better than a shed: the walls are naked, and the mud floor, for the sake of coolness, is every morning sprinkled with a mixture of water and cow-dung. He has no furniture in it. He distributes food to whoever wants it, but he gives no grand dinners to his friends. He throws aside his upper garment, and, with nothing but a cloth round his loins, he sits down half-naked, and eats his meal alone, upon the bare earth, and under the open sky.
Side 325 - But on the other hand, they have no share in making laws for themselves, little in administering them, except in very subordinate offices ; they can rise to no high station, civil or military ; thoy are everywhere regarded as an inferior race, and often rather as vassals or servants than as the ancient owners and masters of the country.
Side 328 - There is one great question to which we should look in all our arrangements ; what is to be their final result on the character of the people ? Is it to be raised or is it to be lowered ? Are we to be satisfied with merely securing our power and protecting the inhabitants, leaving them to sink gradually in character, lower than at present, or are we to endeavour to raise their character, and to render them worthy of filling higher...

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