Poems. With a Biographical and Critical Introduction by the Rev. Thomas Dale: And 75 Illustrations, Volum 1

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Tily and Bogue, 1841

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Side 206 - I'is easy to resign a toilsome place, But not to manage leisure with a grace ; Absence of occupation is not rest ; A mind quite vacant is a mind distress'd.
Side 221 - I am lord of the fowl and the brute. 0 solitude ! where are the charms That sages have seen in thy face? Better dwell in the midst of alarms, Than reign in this horrible place. 1 am out of humanity's reach, I must finish my journey alone, Never hear the sweet music of speech, — I start at the sound of my own. The beasts that roam over the plain My form with indifference see, They are so unacquainted with man, Their tameness is shocking to me.
Side 222 - Convey to this desolate shore Some cordial endearing report Of a land I shall visit no more. My friends, — do they now and then send A wish or a thought after me ? O tell me I yet have a friend, Though a friend I am never to see.
Side 64 - Toilsome and indigent) she renders much ; Just knows, and knows no more, her Bible true A. truth the brilliant Frenchman never knew ; And in that charter reads with sparkling eyes Her title to a treasure in the skies.
Side 262 - The songster heard his short oration, And warbling out his approbation, Released him, as my story tells, And found a supper somewhere else. Hence jarring sectaries may learn Their real interest to discern; That brother should not war with brother, And worry and devour each other; But sing and shine by sweet consent, Till life's poor transient night is spent, Respecting in each other's case The gifts of nature and of grace. Those Christians best deserve the name, Who studiously make peace their aim...
Side 256 - Deem our nation brutes no longer, Till some reason ye shall find Worthier of regard and stronger Than the colour of our kind. Slaves of gold, whose sordid dealings Tarnish all your boasted powers, Prove that you have human feelings Ere you proudly question ours ! PITY FOR POOR AFRICANS.
Side xii - Thy nightly visits to my chamber made, That thou might'st know me safe and warmly laid ; Thy morning bounties ere I left my home, The biscuit, or confectionary plum...
Side 223 - Atlantic billows roared, When such a destined wretch as I, Wash'd headlong from on board, Of friends, of hope, of all bereft, His floating home for ever left. No braver chief could Albion boast Than he with whom he went, Nor ever ship left Albion's coast With warmer wishes sent.
Side 220 - I AM monarch of all I survey, My right there is none to dispute ; From the centre all round to the sea I am lord of the fowl and the brute.
Side xv - Say, wast thou conscious of the tears I shed? Hover'd thy spirit o'er thy sorrowing son, Wretch even then, life's journey just begun? Perhaps thou gavest me, though unfelt, a kiss; Perhaps a tear, if souls can weep in bliss — Ah, that maternal smile! it answers — Yes.

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