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4. To enter upon the second year a Student must have kept the three Terms of the first year, and passed the Examination.

5. To keep the second year the Student must keep three Terms, by attendance on the Lectures of the Professor, and the Lectures of one of the Assistants, the Course being as follows:

Michaelmas Term.-Psalms i. to xviii.
Hilary Term.--Psalms xix. to xxvii.

Trinity Term.—Psalms xxix. to xli. He must also pass an Examination in the Course of the year, to be held at the end of the third Term.

6. To enter upon the third year, the Student must have kept the two former years, and passed the Examinations : and to keep the year, he must attend the Professor's Lectures in Isaiah for three Terms, and pass an Examination at the end of the third Term. The subject of the Examination is Isaiah, chaps. i. to v., and xl. to liï., all inclusive.

7. Students who have kept three years in accordance with the foregoing rules shall have the word "triennium" instead of “ biennium” in their certificate. 8. The Examinations to be held at the end of each

year

shall be conducted by the Professor and his Assistants; and the Students who pass the Examinations shall be placed in order of merit, the Primate's Hebrew Premiums being awarded to those whose answer-. ing may appear to the Examiners to merit such a distinction.

BIBLICAL GREEK.

The Professor of Biblical Greek delivers a Course of public general Prelections during two of the three Academical Terms of each year.

He also delivers special Lectures on particular books of the LXX., or the New Testament, to such Students as may desire to attend them. The subjects and days of Lecture are announced at the beginning of each Term.

The Examination for Prizes is held in Hilary Term. For the regulations and subjects of this Examination see p. 138.

ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY. The Professor of Ecclesiastical History delivers a Course of public general Prelections during two of the three Academical Terms of each year. The Course of Lectures is intended to extend over two years. As the Professor takes part in the final Examination for the Divinity Testimonium, and also in the Examination for the Regius Professor of Divinity's Premiums, attendance on these Lectures is especially recommended to all Students who intend to present themselves at these Examinations.

The Examination for Prizes is held in Michaelmas Term. For the regulations and subjects of this Examination, see p. 138.

MORAL PHILOSOPHY. The Professor of Moral Philosophy delivers a Course of public general Prelections in two of the three Academical Terms. The subjects and days of Lecture are announced at the beginning of the Term. The Lectures are chiefly intended for the benefit of Divinity Students, and of Candidates for Logical and Ethical Moderatorships.

IRISH. The Professor of Irish lectures on two days of the week during Term. The Students attending these Lectures are divided into three Classes, -Junior, Middle, and Senior. The Lectures to the first Class are elementary; those to the Middle and Senior Classes are intended for such Students as have made some progress in the Irish Language. Notice of the days and hours of Lecture is given at the beginning of each Term.

The Examination for Prizes is held in Trinity Term. For the regulations of the Examination, see p. 138.

LAW SCHOOL. STUDENTS in Law must keep six Terms,-three with the Regius Professor of Civil Law, and three Terms with the Regius Professor of Feudal and English Law. Five-sixths of the Lectures of each Term, at least, must be attended in order to get credit for the Term.

CIVIL LAW CLASS.

Law Students may begin to attend the Regius Professor of Civil Law in the first Term of their Senior Sophister year. The Professor delivers twelve Lectures in each Term. To obtain credit for the year, Students must attend three Terms, and pass an Examination at the end of Trinity Term. The following will be the subjects for the present year:

Schrader's Justinian's Institutes.
Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, chap. xliv., with

Guizot's and Warnkönig's notes.
Arnold's Roman History, Vol. I., chap. xiv.
Milman's Latin Christianity, Book 111., chap. v.
Essay on Legislation, in the seventh edition of the Encyclopædia Britan-

nica; Article, LEGISLATION. Story's Conflict of Laws, first three chapters. Whewell's Grotius, Prolegomena and First Book. Creasy's Rise and Progress of the English Constitution. The Examination Papers of the Civil Law Class, printed in the Univer

sity Calendars of 1851, 1852, 1853, 1854, and 1855. The Class Lectures of the year.

Students who comply with these regulations will be considered Law Students, and entitled to the privileges of Professional Students (see page 24).

The Regius Professor of Civil Law will in future give prizes to the best answerers at the annual Examination held by him.

FEUDAL AND ENGLISH LAW CLASS.

Students who have passed the Examination of the Professor of Civil Law may attend the Lectures of the Professor of Feudal and English Law. To obtain credit for the year, they must attend three Terms, and pass an Examination at the end of Trinity Term in subjects prescribed by the Professor. The following will be the subjects for the present year :-

Sugden on Purchasers.
Coke on Littleton.

Sugden on Uses and Trusts. The Professor of Feudal and English Law lectures on the subjeet of Real Property on two days in the week during Term.

The Law Professors give a joint Certificate to Students who have attended the Lectures and passed the examinations of the two years.

The regulations of the Benchers of King's Inns require attendance on both of these courses from all Law Students (previous to being called to the Bar) who are not graduates of Dublin, Oxford, Cambridge, or London; and every Student, if a Graduate of any of these Universities, must, as a condition precedent to his being called to the Bar, produce certificates of his having attended two complete Courses, at least, of Lectures, viz., one complete Course of Lectures of any two, at his option, of the four Law Professors, namely, the Law Professors of the University of Dublin, and those of the King's Inns, and at least five-sixths of the Lectures of each Session or University Term.

By 14 & 15 Vict. c. 88, “ every person who, as a matriculated or non-matriculated Student of the University of Dublin, shall attend any prescribed Lectures, and shall pass any prescribed Examinations of the Professors of Law for a period of two Collegiate years ;" and shall have duly served an apprenticeship for the term of four years, “shall, at any time after the expiration of five years from the commencement of such attendance on Lectures, or of such period of service, which shall first happen, be qualified to be sworn and admitted as an Attorney or Solicitor of the Superior Courts of Law or Equity in Ireland.” The effect of this Act is to enable persons, by attending Law Lectures and Examinations, to abridge the period of their apprenticeship before being sworn Attorneys and Solicitors of the Superior Courts of Law and Equity in Ireland from five years to four.

SCHOOL OF PHYSIC.

THE School of Physic was instituted by Act of Parliament (40 Geo. III. c. 84), and consists of the three University Professors, viz., the Professor of Anatomy—the Professor of Chemistry—and the Professor of Botany; together with the King's Professors of the City of Dublin, on the foundation of Sir Patrick Dun, viz., the Professors of the Institutes of Medicine—the Practice of Medicine and of Materia Medica and Pharmacy. The University has added to these a Professor of Surgery, and the College of Physicians has added a Professor of Midwifery, and one of Medical Jurisprudence.

The Professors, as specified in the Act of Parliament, are bound to give Clinical Lectures at Sir Patrick Dun's Hospital at least two days in each week during every session; and each Professor lectures during the space of three months in alternate succession.

MATRICULATION, All Students in Medicine of the University of Dublin must be matriculated by the Senior Lecturer of Trinity College, for which a fee of five shillings is payable under the Act of Parliament; but no such Student shall be obliged to have his name on the College books, or to attend any of the academical duties of the University, unconnected with the School of Medicine and Surgery, unless he desire to obtain a degree in Medicine, or a diploma in Surgery.

DEGREES IN MEDICINE.

1. Bachelor in Medicine,

A Candidate for the degree of Bachelor in Medicine must be a graduate in Arts, and may obtain the degree of Bachelor in Medicine at the same Commencement as that at which he receives his degree of B. A., or at any subsequent commencement, provided the requisite Medical education shall have been completed.

The Testimonium of the M. B. degree contains the following certificate: “ Testamur A. B. sedulam operam medicinæ navasse, et examina

tiones coram professoribus feliciter sustinuisse." The Medical education of a Bachelor in Medicine is of four years' duration, and comprises attendance on the following courses of lectures :

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