The British encyclopedia, or, Dictionary of arts and sciences, Volum 5

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Side 24 - Parallel straight lines are such as are in the same plane, and which being produced ever so far both ways, do not meet.
Side 66 - The light of the body is the eye if therefore thine eye be single, thy whole body shall be full of light. But if thine eye be evil, thy whole body shall be full of darkness.
Side 66 - I could a tale unfold whose lightest word Would harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood, Make thy two eyes, like stars, start from their spheres, Thy knotted and combined locks to part And each particular hair to stand on end, Like quills upon the fretful porcupine : But this eternal blazon must not be To ears of flesh and blood.
Side 24 - IF a straight line fall upon two parallel straight lines, it makes the alternate angles equal to one another; and the exterior angle equal to the interior and opposite upon the same side; and likewise the two interior angles upon the same side together equal to two right angles...
Side 66 - The lesser circulation is the transmission of the blood from the right to the left side of the heart, through the lungs.
Side 24 - The king's majesty is, by his office and dignity royal, the principal conservator of the peace within all his dominions ; and may give authority to any other to see the peace kept, and to punish such as break it, hence it is usually called the king's peace.

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