The American Historical Review, Volum 7

Forside
John Franklin Jameson, Henry Eldridge Bourne, Robert Livingston Schuyler
American Historical Association, 1902
 

Hva folk mener - Skriv en omtale

Vi har ikke funnet noen omtaler på noen av de vanlige stedene.

Andre utgaver - Vis alle

Vanlige uttrykk og setninger

Populære avsnitt

Side 79 - Our first and fundamental maxim should be, never to entangle ourselves in the broils of Europe. Our second, never to suffer Europe to intermeddle with cisAtlantic affairs.
Side 79 - It is impossible that the allied powers should extend their political system to any portion of either continent without endangering our peace and happiness ; nor can any one believe that our Southern brethren, if left to themselves, would adopt it of their own accord. It is equally impossible, therefore, that we should behold such interposition in any form with indifference.
Side 80 - ... it should be distinctly announced to the world as our settled policy that no future European colony or dominion shall with our consent be planted or established on any part of the North American continent.
Side 116 - Bay for a rule, to show cause why a writ of mandamus should not issue, commanding Col. Hunt to deliver him his commission. Justice Bay dismissed the motion. The relator appealed. His case, and that of M' Daniel, were argued before the Court of Appeals, which rendered its decision on May 24, 1834.
Side 79 - Our policy in regard to Europe, which was adopted at an early stage of the wars which have so long agitated that quarter of the globe, nevertheless remains the same, which is, not to interfere in the internal concerns of any of its powers...
Side 79 - ... these new States are settling down under governments elective and representative in every branch similar to our own. In this course we ardently wish them to persevere, under a firm conviction that it will promote their happiness. In this their career, however, we have not interfered, believing that every people have a right to institute for themselves the government which, in their judgment, may suit them best.
Side 694 - The object of Canning appears to have been to obtain some public pledge from the Government of the United States, ostensibly against the forcible interference of the Holy Alliance between Spain and South America; but really or especially against the acquisition to the United States themselves of any part of the Spanish-American possessions.
Side 227 - We grant no dukedoms to the few, We hold like rights and shall ; — Equal on Sunday in the pew, On Monday in the mall. For what avail the plough or sail, Or land or life, if freedom fail...
Side 487 - I distinctly charged it to General Wade Hampton, and confess I did so pointedly, to shake the faith of his people in him, for he was in my opinion boastful and professed to be the special champion of South Carolina.
Side 81 - ... would partake of the nature of an alliance against the United States, and would be regarded by this government as an indication of unfriendly feeling.

Bibliografisk informasjon