The British Critic and Quarterly Theological Review, Volum 14

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F. and C. Rivington, 1799

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Side 483 - O'er many a frozen, many a fiery Alp, Rocks, caves, lakes, fens, bogs, dens, and shades of death, A universe of death...
Side 469 - But this I confess unto thee, that after the way which they call heresy, so worship I the God of my fathers, believing all things which are written in the law and in the prophets...
Side 67 - Yes, such protection as vultures give to lambs - covering and devouring them! - They call on us to barter all of good we have inherited and proved, for the desperate chance of something better which they promise. - Be our plain answer this: The Throne WE honour is the PEOPLE'S CHOICE - the laws we reverence are our brave Fathers...
Side 67 - Yes, such protection as vultures give to lambs — covering and devouring them ! They call on us to barter all of good we have inherited and proved, for the desperate chance of something better which they promise. Be our plain answer this : The throne we honour is the people's choice; the laws we reverence are our brave fathers...
Side 26 - Unfading HOPE ! when life's last embers burn, When soul to soul, and dust to dust return ! Heaven to thy charge resigns the awful hour ! Oh ! then, thy kingdom comes.! Immortal Power ! What though each spark of earthborn rapture fly The quivering lip, pale cheek, and closing eye ! Bright to the soul thy seraph hands convey The morning dream of life's eternal day — Then, then, the triumph and the trance begin, And all the phoenix spirit burns within ! Oh!
Side 26 - Cease, every joy, to glimmer on my mind, But leave — oh ! leave the light of HOPE behind ! What though my winged hours of bliss have been, Like angel-visits, few and far between...
Side 405 - Upon this the lady gave it him, and told him its many virtues, viz. that it cured all diseases in cattle, and the bite of a mad dog both in man and beast. It is used by dipping the stone in water, which is given to the diseased cattle to drink ; and the person who has been bit, and the wound or part infected, is washed with the water.
Side 67 - They, by a strange frenzy driven, fight for power, for plunder, and extended rule. We, for our country, our altars, and our homes. They follow an adventurer whom they fear, and obey a power which they hate. We serve a monarch whom we love — a God whom we adore.
Side 481 - For from cock-crow he had been travelling, And there was not a cloud in the sky. He drank of the water so cool and clear, For thirsty and hot was he, And he sat down upon the bank Under the willow-tree.
Side 611 - ... and phrases being taken out of the holy Scriptures, and the rest are the expressions of the first and purest ages ; so that whoever takes exception at these must quarrel with the language of the Holy Ghost, and fall out with the Church in her greatest innocence ; and in the opinion of the most impartial and excellent Grotius, (who was no member of, nor had any obligation to, this Church,) the English Liturgy comes so near to the primitive pattern, that none of the Reformed Churches can compare...

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