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THE

PARENT'S ASSISTANT;

OR,

STORIES FOR CHILDREN.

BY

MARIA EDGEWORTH.

IN SIX VOLUMES.

VOL. VI.

CONTAINING

BARRING OUT,
ETON MONTEM.

NEW EDITION.

LONDON:

PRINTED FOR R, HUNTER,
SUCCESSOR TO THE LATE J. JOHNSON;
AND BALDWIN, CRADOCK, AND JOY,

PATERNOSTER-ROW.

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THE

BARRING OUT;

OR,

PARTY SPIRIT.

“ The mother of mischief,” says an old proverb, “is no bigger than a midge's wing."

At Doctor Middleton's school, there was a great tall dunce of the name of Fisher, who never could be taught how to look out a word in a dictionary. He used to torment every body with

pray help me! I can't make out this one word.” — The person who usually helped him in his distress, was a very clever good-natured boy, of the name of De Grey. De Grey had been many years under Dr. Middleton's care, and by his abilities and good conduct

VOL. VI.

Do

B

did him great credit. The Doctor certainly was both proud and fond of him; but he was so well beloved, or so much esteemed by his companions, that nobody had ever called him by the odious name of favourite until the arrival of a new scholar of the name of Archer.

Till Archer came, the ideas of favourites and parties were almost unknown at Dr. Middleton's; but he brought all these ideas fresh from a great public school, at which he had been educated at which he had acquired a sufficient quantity of Greek and Latin, and a superabundant quantity of partyspirit. His aim, the moment that he came to a new school, was to get to the head of it, or at least to form the strongest party. His influence, for he was a boy of considerable abilities, was quick

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ly felt, though he had a powerful rival, as he thought proper to call him, in De Grey; and, with him, a rival was always an enemy. De Grey, so far from giving him any cause of hatred, treated him with a degree of cordiality, which would probably have had an effect upon Archer's mind, if it had not been for the artifices of Fisher.

It may seem surprising that a great dunce should be able to work upon a boy like Archer, who was called a great genius; but when genius is joined to a violent temper, instead of being united to good sense, it is at the mercy even of dunces.

Fisher was mortally offended one morning by De Grey's refusing to translate his whole lesson for him. He went over to Archer, who, considering him as a partisan deserting from the enemy,

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