A Treatise on the Passions and Affections of the Mind, Philosophical, Ethical, and Theological: In a Series of Disquisitions, in which are Traced, the Moral History of Man, in His Pursuits, Powers, and Motives of Action, and the Means of Obtaining Permanent Well-being and Happiness, Volum 1

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T. Cadell and W. Davies, 1813
 

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Side 317 - Glistering with dew: fragrant the fertile earth After soft showers; and sweet the coming on Of grateful evening mild; then silent night, With this her solemn bird, and this fair moon, And these the gems of heaven, her starry train: But neither breath of morn, when she ascends With charm of earliest birds; nor rising sun On this delightful land; nor herb, fruit, flower, Glistering with dew; nor fragrance after showers; Nor grateful evening mild; nor silent night, With this her solemn bird; nor walk...
Side 316 - With thee conversing I forget all time ; All seasons and their change, all please alike. Sweet is the breath of morn, her rising sweet, With charm of earliest birds...
Side 317 - But neither breath of morn, when she ascends With charm of earliest birds; nor rising sun On this delightful land; nor herb, fruit, flower, Glistering with dew; nor fragrance after showers; Nor grateful evening mild; nor silent night, With this her solemn bird, nor walk by moon, Or glittering starlight, without thee is sweet But wherefore all night long shine these?
Side 151 - And overcome us like a summer's cloud, Without our special wonder? You make me strange Even to the disposition that I owe...
Side 204 - twas wondrous pitiful : She wish'd she had not heard it ; yet she wish'd That heaven had made her such a man : she thank'd me; And bade me, if I had a friend that lov'd her, I should but teach him how to tell my story, And that would woo her. Upon this hint I spake"; She lov'd me for the dangers I had pass'd, And I lov'd her, that she did pity them.
Side 177 - t; I have use for it. Go, leave me. — (Exit Emilia). I will in Cassio's lodging lose this napkin, And let him find it. Trifles, light as air, Are to the jealous confirmations strong As proofs of Holy Writ.
Side 98 - she never told her love, but let concealment, like a worm in the bud, feed on her damask cheek. She pined in thought, and with a green and yellow melancholy, she sat like Patience on a monument, smiling at Grief.
Side 355 - An internal motion or agitation of the mind, when it passeth away without desire, is denominated an emotion: when desire follows, the motion or agitation is denominated a passion. A fine face, for example, raiseth in me a pleasant feeling; if that feeling vanish without producing any effect, it is in proper language an emotion ; but if the feeling, by reiterated views of the...
Side 142 - ... marriage to its primitive institution, concubinage has been forbidden and condemned among christians. CONDESCENSION is that species of benevolence which designedly waves the supposed advantages of birth, title, or station, in order to accommodate ourselves to the state of an inferior, and diminish that restraint which the apparent distance is calculated to produce in him. It is enjoined on the Christian, and is peculiarly ornamental to the Christian character, Rom. xii, 16.

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