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CONTRACTS SIGNED BY THE FIRST ASSISTANT.

The bonds of all postmasters may, by the direction of the Postmaster-General, be approved and accepted, and the approval and acceptance signed by the First Assistant Postmaster General in the name of the Postmaster-General; and all contracts for stationery, wrapping-paper, letter-balances, scales, and street letterboxes for the use of the postal service, may be signed in like manner by the First Assistant Postmaster-General, in the place and stead of the PostmasterGeneral, and his signature shall be attested by the seal of the Post-Office Department.

ASSISTANT POSTMASTERS-GENERAL. |ion of the advertising, and management of the general work of the Department not otherwise assigned. To it is attached the office of the Topographer, charged with the duty of keeping up the maps in constant use in the Department proper, with the preparation and publication of new and revised post-route maps, with supplying maps to all branches of the postal service, and with furnishing information for the settlement of all gov ernmental mileage and telegraph_accounts; the office of the Superintendent and Disbursing Clerk, to which is assigned the supervision of all repairs, the care of the public property in, and the furnishing of the Departmental building, and the disbursement of the salaries of the officers and employés of the Department; the office of the Chief Special Agent, to which are referred all cases of losses or irregularities in the mails, and all reported violations of the postal law; and the Division of Special Agents and Mail Depredations, to which are referred all accounts of Special Agents for salary, per diem, and allowance.

CONTRACTS SIGNED BY THE SECOND ASSISTANT. The Second Assistant Postmaster-General, on the order of the PostmasterGeneral, may sign with his name, in the place and stead of the Postmaster-General, and attest his signature by the seal of the Post-Office Department, all contracts made in the said Department for mail transportation, and for supplies of mail-bags, mail-catchers, mail-locks and keys, and all other articles necessary and incidental to mail transportation.

THE OFFICE OF THE FIRST ASSISTANT POST-
MASTER-GENERAL.

To this office is assigned the duty of preparing all cases for the establishment, CONTRACTS SIGNED BY THE THIRD ASSISTANT. discontinuance, and change of name or The Third Assistant Postmaster-Gen-site of post-offices, and for the appointeral, when directed by the Postmaster- ment of all postmasters, and employés General, may also sign, in his name, in of the Railway Mail Service, and all corthe place and stead of the Postmaster- respondence incident thereto; the duty General, and attest his signature by the of readjusting the salaries of postmasseal of the Post-Office Department, all ters, and the consideration of allowances contracts for supplies of postage-stamps, for rent, fuel, and lights, clerk-hire, and stamped envelopes, newspaper-wrappers, miscellaneous expenditures; of receiving postal cards, registered-package envel- and recording appointments, of receiving, opes, locks, seals, and official envelopes entering, and filing bonds and oaths of for the use of postmasters, and return of postmasters and issuing their commisdead letters, that may be required for the sions. This office is also charged with postal service. the correspondence with postmasters and the public upon questions relating to the character and classification of mail-matDISTRIBUTION OF THE BUSINESS OF ter, and the rates of postage thereon,

THE DEPARTMENT.

THE OFFICE OF THE POSTMASTER-GENEral.
The duties of this office are under the

under the direct supervision of the Law Clerk of the Department. To it is

immediate supervision of the chief clerk of one or more of these maps to individuals at the The Postmaster-General may authorize the sale of the Department, and relate to the mis- cost thereof; the proceeds to be applied as a further cellaneous correspondence of the Depart-appropriation towards the preparation and publication of post-route maps (including the miscellaneous ment not specially connected with its other offices; the appointment of Department employés; the recording of orders promulgated by the Postmaster-General; the fixing of rates for the transmission of Government telegrams; the supervis

expenses of the Topographer's office). It is impliedly understood that sales can only be made from surplus copies, after the immediate wants of the Department are supplied; postmasters and others in the service being furnished with these maps only in cases deemed needful by the Department. For tariff of prices and Topographer of the Post-Office Department.

other information, application should be made to the

attached the Division of Free Delivery, having in charge the preparation of cases for the inauguration of the system in cities, the appointment of letter-carriers, and the regulation of allowances for incidental expenses, as well as the general supervision of the free-delivery system throughout the United States; and also the Blank Agency, to which is assigned the duty of supplying the post-offices entitled thereto with blanks, wrappingpaper, and twine, letter-balances, and cancelling-stamps, and the Department with stationery.

bag-catchers, is also in charge of this office. To it is attached the Division of Inspection, to which is assigned the duty of receiving and inspecting the monthly registers of arrivals and departures, reporting the performance of mail service; also special reports of failures or delinquencies on the part of mail contractors or their agents, and of noting such failures or delinquencies, and preparing cases of fines or deductions by reason thereof; of conducting the correspondence growing out of reports of failures or delinquencies in the transportation of the mails; of reporting to the Auditor of

THE OFFICE OF THE SECOND ASSISTANT POST- the Treasury for the Post-Office Depart

MASTER-GENERAL.

To this office is assigned the business of arranging the mail service of the United States, and placing the same under contract, embracing all correspondence and proceedings respecting the frequency of trips, mode of conveyance, and times of departures and arrivals on all the routes; the course of the mails between the different sections of the country, the points of mail distribution, and the regulations for the government of the domestic mail service of the United States. It prepares the advertisements for mail proposals, receives the bids, and has charge of the annual and miscellaneous mail lettings, and the adjustment and execution of the contracts. All applications for mail service or change of mail arrangements, and for mail messengers, should be sent to this office. All claims should be submitted to it for transportation service. From this office all postmasters at the end of routes receive the statement of mail arrangements prescribed for the respective routes. It reports weekly to the Auditor all contracts executed, and all orders affecting the accounts for mail transportation; prepares the statistical exhibits of the mail service, and the reports to Congress of the mail lettings, giving a statement of each bid; also, of the contracts made, the new service originated, the curtailments ordered, and the additional allowances granted within the year. The rates of pay for the transportation of the mails on railroad routes, according to the amount and character of the service, are adjusted by this office. It also directs the weighing of the mails on the same, and authorizes new service on railroad routes. The issuing of mail-locks and keys, mail-pouches and sacks, and the supervision of the construction of mail

ment, at the close of each quarter, by certificate of inspection, the fact of performance or non-performance of contract or recognized mail service, noting therein such fine or deduction as may have been ordered; of authorizing the payment of all employés of the Railway Mail Service; also the payment of such acting employés as may be employed by this office through the Superintendent of Railway Mail Service in cases of emergency, and of authorizing the Auditor to credit postmasters with sums paid by them for such temporary service; and such other duties as may be necessary to secure a faithful performance of the mail service. All complaints against mail contractors or their agents, relating to failures or other irregularities in the transportation of the mails, whether made by postmasters or others, should be promptly forwarded to the Second Assistant Postmaster-General, marked “Division of Inspection."

THE OFFICE OF THE THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER-GENERAL.

This office is charged with the duty of issuing drafts and warrants in payment of balances reported by the Auditor to be due to mail contractors or other persons; the superintendence of the collection of revenue at depository, draft, and depositing post-offices, and the accounts between the Department and Treasurer and Assistant Treasurers and specially designated depositories of the United States. It receives all accounts, monthly or quarterly, of the depository or draft post-offices, and certificates of deposit from depositing post-offices. This office is also charged with the duty of preparing instructions for the guidance of postmasters respecting registered matter, and all correspondence connected with the Registry System of the United States.

FORCE OF POSTMASTER-GENERAL'S

OFFICE.

Per Annum.

1800

Chief clerk to the Postmaster-General....$2200
Appointment clerk............
1 stenographer........................
........................................... 1800
1 law clerk.......

....................................................

2250

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To it is attached the Division of PostageStamps, and Stamped Envelopes, and Postal Cards, having charge of the issuing of postage-stamps, stamped envelopes, newspaper-wrappers, and postal cards, and the supplying of postmasters with envelopes for their official use, and registered-package envelopes and seals; the Division of Dead Letter (so desig nated in the law, but more properly called The Return Letter Office), having assigned to it the examination and return FORCE OF THE OFFICE OF FIRST ASto the writers of undelivered mail-matter, and all correspondence relating thereto. The agencies having the supervision of the manufacture of postage-stamps, 2 clerks, each. stamped envelopes, and postal cards, are also under the direction of this office.

SISTANT POSTMASTER-GENERAL.

Chief clerk....

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Per Annum. .$2000

........... 1800

1600

1400

1200

1000

720

1800

assistant messengers, each............
1 superintendent blank agency....

1 assistant superintendent blank agency. 1600
4 assistants
to superintendent blank
agency, each..

2 assistants to superintendent blank
agency, each....................

1 assistant messenger........................................
1 laborer...

1 superintendent free delivery.
1 clerk..

1200

900

720

660

2100

1400

FORCE OF THE OFFICE OF SECOND AS-
SISTANT POSTMASTER-GENERAL.

Chief clerk.....

Chief of division of inspection.......
7 clerks, each..

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Per Annum.

........$2000

2000

1800

1600

1400

1200

1000

720

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Per Annum. | sheets, without board, cloth, leather, or

Superintendent money-order system.......$3000 other substantial binding.

Chief clerk......... 2 clerks, each..

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It must be originated and published for the dissemination of information of a public character, or devoted to literature, the sciences, arts, or some special industry, and having a legitimate list of subscribers, and not designed primarily for advertising purposes, or for free circulation, or for circulation at nominal

rates.

Publications of the second class, except 1400 as provided in the next paragraph, when 1200 sent by the publisher thereof, and from 1000 the office of publication, including sample copies, or when sent from a news agency to actual subscribers thereto, or to other news agents, shall be entitled to transmission through the mails at two cents a pound or fraction thereof, such postage to be prepaid, as now provided by law.

..$2100

1400 ... 1200

engineer.......................................... 1400 900

1 assistant engineer......

900

1 fireman and blacksmith..................... 66 steam-fitter..................... 900

1 66

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Publications of the second class, one copy to each actual subscriber residing 720 in the county where the same are printed, 1200 in whole or in part, and published, shall 1000 go free through the mails; but the same 720 shall not be delivered at letter-carrier 660 offices, or distributed by carriers, unless

1000

RATES OF POSTAGE ON DOMESTIC
MAIL-MATTER.

FIRST-CLASS MATTER. Matter which is in writing, or other matter containing a written inscription in the nature of personal correspondence, and matter which is sealed against inspection, are alone by their nature and the intent of the law first-class matter, and subject to the postage rate of three cents for each half ounce or fraction thereof.

On local or drop letters, at offices where free delivery by carriers is established, two cents for each half ounce or fraction thereof.

On local or drop letters, at offices where free delivery by carriers is not established, one cent for each half ounce or fraction thereof.

SECOND-CLASS MATTER.

Mailable matter of the second class embraces all newspapers and other periodical publications which are issued at stated intervals, and as frequently as four times a year. It must bear a date of issue, and be numbered consecutively.

It must be issued from a known office of publication.

It must be formed of printed paper

postage is paid thereon at the rate prescribed in the preceding paragraph: Provided, that the rate of postage on newspapers (excepting weeklies) and periodicals not exceeding two ounces in weight, when the same are deposited in a lettercarrier office for delivery by its carriers, shall be uniform at one cent each; periodicals weighing more than two ounces shall be subject, when delivered by such carriers, to a postage of two cents each. and these rates shall be prepaid by stamps affixed.

Periodical publications, on their receipt at the office of mailing, shall be weighed in bulk, and postage paid thereon by a special adhesive stamp, which shall be affixed to such matter, or to the sack containing the same, or upon a memorandum of such mailing.

Mailable matter of the second class, deposited in a letter-carrier post-office for local delivery, shall be delivered through boxes, or the general delivery, on prepayment of postage at the rate of two cents per pound; but when delivered by carriers the following rates must be prepaid by postage-stamps affixed:

On newspapers (except weeklies), one cent each, without regard to weight. On periodicals not exceeding two ounces in weight, one cent each.

On periodicals exceeding two ounces in weight, two cents each.

The rate on weekly newspapers of the second class, deposited by the publisher in a letter-carrier post-office for local delivery, is two cents per pound, whether the same are delivered by carriers, or through boxes, or the general delivery. Mailable matter of the second class shall contain no writing, print, mark, or sign thereon or therein, in addition to the original print, except the name and address of the person to whom the matter shall be sent, and index figures of subscription book, either written printed, the printed title of the publication, the printed name and address of the publisher or sender of the same, and written or printed words or figures, or both, indicating the date on which the subscription to such matter will end.

THIRD-CLASS MATTER.

or

Mail-matter of the third class embraces books (printed and blank), transient newspapers and periodicals, circulars, and other matter wholly in print, proof-sheets and corrected proof-sheets, and manuscript copy accompanying the same, prices current, with prices filled out in writing, printed commercial papers filled out in writing (provided such writing is not in the nature of personal correspondence), such as papers of legal procedure, deeds of all kinds, way-bills, bills of lading, invoices, insurance policies, and the various documents of insurance companies, hand-bills, posters, chromo-lithographs, engravings, envelopes with printing thereon, heliotypes, lithographs, photographic and stereoscopic views with title written thereon, printed blanks, printed cards; and postage shall be paid thereon at the rate of one cent for each two ounces or fractional part thereof.

Upon matter of the third class, or upon the wrapper enclosing the same, the sender may write his own name or address thereon, with the word "from" above and preceding the same, and in either case may make simple marks intended to designate a word or passage of the text to which it is desired to call attention. There may be placed upon the cover or blank leaves of any book, or of any printed matter of the third class, a simple manuscript dedication or inscription that does not partake of the nature of a personal correspondence.

All packages of matter of the third class must be so wrapped, with open sides or ends, that their contents may be readily examined by postmasters.

Third-class matter may be registered. The limit of weight of packages is four pounds, except in cases of single volumes of books in excess of said weight, and books and documents published or circulated by order of Congress, or official matter emanating from any of the Departments of the Government, or from the Smithsonian Institution.

FOURTH-CLASS MATTER.

Mailable matter of the fourth class em

braces blank cards, card-board, and other flexible material, flexible patterns, letter envelopes and letter-paper, without printing thereon, merchandise, models, ornamented paper, sample cards, samples of ores, metals, minerals, seeds, cuttings, bulbs, roots, scions, drawings, plans, designs, original paintings in oil or water-colors, and any other matter not included in the first, second, or third classes, and which is not in its form or nature liable to destroy, deface, or otherwise damage the contents of the mail-bag, or harm the person of any one engaged in the postal service. Postage rate thereon, one cent for each ounce or fractional part thereof.

Other articles of the fourth class which, unless properly secured, might destroy, deface, or otherwise damage the contents of the mail-bag, or harm the person of any one engaged in the postal service, may be transmitted in the mails when they conform to the following conditions: 1st. They must be placed in a bag, box, or removable envelope made of paper, cloth, or parchment. 2d. Such bag, box, or envelope must again be placed in a box or tube made of metal or some hard wood, with sliding, clasp, or screw lid. 3d. In case of articles liable to break, the inside box, bag, or envelope must be surrounded by sawdust, cotton, or spongy substance. 4th. In case of sharp-pointed instruments, the points must be capped or encased, so that they may not by any means be liable to cut through their enclosure; and where they have blades, such blades must be bound with wire, so that they shall remain firmly attached to each other. 5th. The whole must be capable of easy inspection. Seeds, or other articles not prohibited, which are liable from their form or nature to loss or damage, unless specially protected, may be put up in sealed envelopes, provided such envelopes are made of material sufficiently transparent to show the contents clearly, without opening.

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