The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England: A New Edition:

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William Pickering., 1831

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Side 131 - But things which are equal to the same are equal to one another || ; therefore CA is equal to CB ; wherefore CA,
Side 25 - MAN, as the minister and interpreter of nature, does and understands as much, as his observations on the order of nature, either with regard to things or the mind, permit him, and neither knows nor is capable of more.
Side 26 - Even the effects already discovered are due to chance and experiment rather than to the sciences. For our present sciences are nothing more than peculiar arrangements of matters already discovered, and not methods for discovery or plans for new operations.
Side 32 - ... infinity in time past and in time to come can by no means hold; for it would thence follow that one infinity is greater than another, and that infinity is wasting away and tending to become finite. The like subtlety arises touching the infinite divisibility of lines, from the same inability of thought to stop.
Side 31 - Lastly, there are idols which have crept into men's minds from the various dogmas of peculiar systems of philosophy, and also from the perverted rules of demonstration, and these we denominate idols of the theatre. For we regard all the systems of philosophy hitherto received or imagined, as so many plays brought out and performed, creating fictitious and theatrical worlds. Nor do we speak only of the present systems, or of the philosophy and sects of the ancients, since numerous other plays of a...
Side 62 - ... the shortness of life, the deception of the senses, and weakness of the judgment. They think, therefore, that in the revolutions of ages and of the world there are certain floods and ebbs of the sciences, and that they grow and flourish at one...
Side 83 - It is the glory of God to conceal a thing : but the honour of kings is to search out a matter.
Side 364 - Hope is the most beneficial of all the affections, and doth much to the prolongation of life, if it be not too often frustrated, but entertaineth the fancy with an expectation of good ; therefore they which fix and propound to themselves some end, as the mark and scope of their life, and continually and by degrees go forward in the same, are, for the most part, long-lived ; insomuch that when they are come to the top of their hope, and can go no higher therein, they commonly droop, and live not long...
Side 35 - For men imagine that their reason governs words, whilst, in fact, words react upon the understanding ; and this has rendered philosophy and the sciences sophistical and inactive.
Side 27 - ... proceeds to judgment and to the discovery of middle axioms. And this way is now in fashion. The other derives axioms from the senses and particulars, rising by a gradual and unbroken ascent, so that it arrives at the most general...

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