The history and proceedings of the House of lords, from the Restoration in 1660, to the present time ... With an account of the promotions of the several peers, and the state of the peerage in every reign: Connected with the Transactions of the Commons, and history of the times, And illustrated with historical notes and observations. Together with the debates in the Parliament of Scotland relating to the Union. To each volume are added proper indexes ...

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Side 220 - Wit, my Lords, is a sort of property; it is the property of those who have it, and too often the only property they have to depend on. It is indeed but a precarious dependence. Thank God! we, my Lords, have a dependence of another kind...
Side 218 - Tis true, the Court had, at that Time, a great deal of Wit; it was then indeed full of Men of true Wit and great Humour; but it was the more dangerous; for the Courtiers did then, as thorough-paced Courtiers always will do, they sacrificed their...
Side 232 - And until you withdraw your regard and confidence from those by whose instigation and advice you are directed and encouraged in your unwarrantable behaviour to me and to the Queen, and until you return to your duty, you shall not reside in my palace, which I will not suffer to be made the resort of them who, under the appearance of an attachment to you, foment the division which you have made in my family, and thereby weaken the common interest of the whole.
Side 220 - ... where they may be detained for fourteen days, and even then he may find them returned as prohibited goods, by which his chief and best market will be for ever...
Side 444 - WE, your majefty's moft dutiful and loyal fubjefh, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, in parliament aflembled, beg leave to return your majefty our humble thanks for your moil gracious fpeech from the throne.
Side 231 - ... voluntarily declared, of her labour ; and both times upon your return you industriously concealed from the knowledge of me and the Queen every circumstance relating to this important affair ; and you at last, without giving any notice to me or to the Queen, precipitately...
Side 17 - ... and unless the same be made to take effect in possession for the charitable use intended, immediately from the making thereof, and be without any power of revocation, reservation, trust, condition, limitation, clause or agreement whatsoever, for the benefit of the donor or grantor, or of any person or persons claiming under him.
Side 222 - ... be too late to think of preventing or avoiding the impending ruin. The stage, my lords, and the press, are two of our out-sentries ; if we remove them, if we hoodwink them — if we throw them in fetters, the enemy may surprise us.
Side 16 - ... months at least before the death of the grantor, or to the transfer of any stock six calendar months before the death of the grantor, or person making such transfer, shall...
Side 220 - Court, and from thence spreads through the country, by laying the stage under an arbitrary Court-licence, instead of leaving it what it is, and always ought to be, a gentle scourge for the vices of great men and courtiers, you will make it a canal for propagating and conveying their vices and follies through the whole kingdom. From hence, my Lords, I think it must appear, that the Bill now before us cannot...

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