Holborn and Bloomsbury

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A. & C. Black, 1903 - 106 sider

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Side 26 - And to be grave exceeds all power of face. I sit with sad civility, I read With honest anguish and an aching head, And drop at last, but in unwilling ears, This saving counsel,
Side 91 - We were almost out of hope, when an honest man, who was at work, directed us to the next ground, adjoining to a pond. There we found what we sought, about three-quarters of a mile north of Montague House, and 500 yards east of Tottenham Court Road. The steps are of the size of a large human foot, about three inches deep, and lie nearly from north-east to south-west. We counted only seventy-six ; but we were not exact in counting. The place where one or both the brothers are supposed to have fallen...
Side 32 - Cross not with venturous step ; there oft is found The lurking thief, who, while the daylight shone, Made the walls echo with his begging tone : That crutch, which late compassion mov'd, shall wound Thy bleeding head, and fell thee to the ground. Though thou art tempted by the linkman's call, Yet trust him not along the lonely wall ; In the mid-way he'll quench the flaming brand, And share the booty with the pilfering band, Still keep the public streets where oily rays Shot from the crystal lamp...
Side 91 - ... of the size of a large human foot, about three inches deep, and lie nearly from northeast to south-west. We counted only seventy-six ; but we were not exact in counting. The place where one or both the brothers are supposed to have fallen, is still bare of grass. The labourer also showed us the bank where (the tradition is) the wretched woman sat to see the combat.
Side 50 - There were then few hackneycoaches, and we got both into one sedan-chair. Turning out of Fleet Street into Fetter Lane, there was a sort of contest, between our chairmen and some persons who were coming up Fleet Street, whether they should first pass Fleet Street, or we in our chair first get out of Fleet Street into Fetter Lane. In the struggle, the sedan-chair was overset with us in it.
Side 26 - To Westminster; in the way meeting many milkmaids with their garlands upon their pails, dancing with a fiddler before them ; and saw pretty Nelly standing at her lodgings' door in Drurylane in her smock-sleeves and bodice, looking upon one ; she seemed a mighty pretty creature."— Pepys.
Side 91 - We sought for near half an hour in vain. We could find no steps at all within a quarter of a mile, no, nor half a mile, north of Montague House. We were almost out of hope, when an honest man who was at work directed us to the next ground, adjoining to a pond. There we found what we sought...
Side 4 - We took one coach, two coachmen, and four horses, And merrily from London made our courses, We wheel'd the top of the heavy hill call'd Holborn, (Up which hath been full many a sinful soul borne,) And so along we jolted past St.
Side 23 - I went also to see the building beginning near St. Giles's, where seven streets make a star from a Doric pillar placed in the middle of a circular area ; said to be built by Mr.
Side 91 - We could find no steps at all, within a quarter of a mile, no nor half a mile, of Montague House. We were almost out of hope, when an honest man who was at work directed us to the next ground adjoining to a pond. There we found what we sought, about three quarters of a mile north of Montague House, and about 500 yards east of Tottenham Court Road.

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