Artis logicae rudimenta: with illustrative observations on each section by John Hill

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J.H. Parker, 1850 - 390 sider

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Side 259 - And to seeds, as of many; but as of one; And to thy seed, which is Christ. And this I say, That the covenant that was confirmed before of God in Christ, the Law, which was four hundred and thirty years after, cannot disannul, that it should make the promise of none effect. For if the inheritance be of the Law, it is no more of promise ; but God gave it to Abraham by promise.
Side 260 - But if there be no resurrection of the dead, then is Christ not risen : and if Christ be not risen, then is our preaching vain, and your faith is also vain.
Side 94 - It was therefore necessary that the patterns of things in the heavens should be purified with these ; but the heavenly things themselves with better sacrifices than these.
Side 148 - Again ; the mathematical postulate, that " things which are equal to the same are equal to one another," is similar to the form of the syllogism in logic, which unites things agreeing in the middle term.
Side 259 - They went out from us, but they were not of us ; for if they had been of us, they would no doubt have continued with us : but they went out, that they might be made manifest that they were not all of us.
Side 9 - And when the people saw what Paul had done, they lifted up their voices, saying in the speech of Lycaonia, The gods are come down to us, in the likeness of men.
Side 382 - ... benevolence, and the want of it, singly considered, are in no sort the whole of virtue and vice. For if this were the case, in the review of one's own character, or that of others, our moral understanding and moral sense would be indifferent to every thing, but the degrees in which benevolence prevailed, and the degrees in which it was wanting.
Side 386 - A miracle is a violation of the laws of nature ; and as a firm and unalterable experience has established these laws, the proof against a miracle, from the very nature of the fact, is as entire as any argument from experience can possibly be imagined.
Side 327 - I am an old man, sir,' quoth he, 'and I may remember the building of Tenterton steeple; and I may remember when there was no steeple at all there. And before that...
Side 328 - And he answered, I have not troubled Israel ; but thou, and thy father's house, in that ye have forsaken the commandments of the Lord, and thou hast followed Baalim.

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