Life and Times of Sir Joshua Reynolds: With Notices of Some of His Cotemporaries[sic]. Commenced by Charles Robert Leslie, R.A. Continued and Concluded by Tom Taylor, M.A. In Two Volumes. With Portraits and Illustrations, Volum 1

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Side 373 - The sober herd that low'd to meet their young, The noisy geese that gabbled o'er the pool, The playful children just let loose from school, The watch-dog's voice that bay'd the whispering wind, And the loud laugh that spoke the vacant mind; — These all in sweet confusion sought the shade, And fill'd each pause the nightingale had made.
Side 365 - To them his heart, his love, his griefs were given, But all his serious thoughts had rest in Heaven. As some tall cliff that lifts its awful form, Swells from the vale, and midway leaves the storm...
Side 365 - ... A man he was to all the country dear, And passing rich with forty pounds a year; Remote from towns, he ran his godly race, Nor e'er had...
Side 365 - A man he was to all the country dear, And passing rich with forty pounds a year; Remote from towns he ran his godly race, Nor e'er had changed, nor wished to change, his place.
Side 373 - Nature, or in other words, what is particular and uncommon, can be acquired only by experience ; and the whole beauty and grandeur of the art consists, in my opinion, in being able to get above all singular forms, local customs, particularities, and details of every kind.
Side 220 - ... of my country. But however that might be, this speech was somewhat unlucky ; for with that quickness of wit for which he was so remarkable, he seized the expression
Side 376 - The painters who have applied themselves more particularly to low and vulgar characters, and who express with precision the various shades of passion, as they are exhibited by vulgar minds (such as we see in the works of Hogarth), deserve great praise; but as their genius has been employed on low and confined subjects, the praise which we give must be as limited as its object.
Side 220 - Scotland," cried Davies, roguishly. "Mr. Johnson (said I), I do indeed come from Scotland, but I cannot help it.
Side 264 - Here Hickey reclines, a most blunt pleasant creature, And slander itself must allow him good nature ; He cherish'd his friend, and he relish'da bumper; Yet one fault he had, and that one was a thumper! Perhaps you may ask if the man was a miser? I answer no, no, for he always was wiser: Too courteous, perhaps, or obligingly flat? His very worst foe can't accuse him of that. Perhaps he confided in men as they go, And so was too foolishly honest? ah, no! Then what was his failing? come tell it, and,...
Side 169 - Horatio— heavens, what a transition ! — it seemed as if a whole century had been swept over in the transition of a single scene ; old things were done away and a new order at once brought forward, bright and luminous, and clearly destined to dispel the barbarisms and bigotry of a tasteless age, too long attached to the prejudices of custom, and superstitiously devoted to the illusions of imposing declamation.

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