Sidebilder
PDF
ePub

SUPPLEMENTAL ESTIMATE-GOVERNMENT PRINTING

OFFICE

COMMUNICATION

FROM

THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

TRANSMITTING

SUPPLEMENTAL ESTIMATE OF APPROPRIATION FOR THE LEGIS-
LATIVE ESTABLISHMENT, GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE,
FISCAL YEAR 1949, AMOUNTING TO $191,900 IN THE FORM OF
AN AMENDMENT TO THE BUDGET

May 19 (legislative day, May 10), 1948.- Read; referred to the Committee on

Appropriations and ordered to be printed

pri ATE

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, May 18, 1948. The PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE PRO TEMPORE.

Sir: I have the honor to transmit herewith for the consideration of Congress a supplemental estimate of appropriation for the fiscal year 1949, in the amount of $191,900, for the legislative branch, Government Printing Office, in the form of an amendment to the Budget for said fiscal year.

The details of this estimate are set forth in the accompanying letter of the Director of the Bureau of the Budget. Respectfully yours,

HARRY S. TRUMAN.

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT,

BUREAU OF THE BUDGET,

Washington 25, D. C., May 18, 1948. The PRESIDENT,

The White House. SIR: I have the honor to submit herewith for your consideration a supplemental estimate of appropriation for the fiscal year 1949, in the amount of $191,900, for the legislative branch, Government Printing Office, in the form of an amendment to the Budget for said fiscal year, as follows:

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH

[blocks in formation]

The Public Printer states that this supplemental estimate is submitted to cover increased costs of items purchased by the Superintendent of Documents in the discharge of his service functions, and that changed conditions since the original estimate was submitted in the Budget for the fiscal year 1949 make this supplemental estimate necessary.

This being an estimate for the legislative branch, I make no observation concerning its necessity. Respectfully yours,

FRANK PACE, Jr., Acting Director of the Bureau of the Budget.

[ocr errors][merged small]

STATEHOOD FOR ALASKA

MESSAGE ·

IBOM

THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

RELATIVE TO

ENACTMENT OF NECESSARY LEGISLATION TO ADMIT ALASKA TO

STATEHOOD AT THE EARLIEST POSSIBLE DATE

May 21 (legislative day, May 20), 1948.- Read; referred to the Committee on

Interior and Insular Affairs, and ordered to be printed

To the Congress of the United States:

Alaska is our last great frontier area, and has the capacity to provide new opportunities for many thousands of our citizens. It contains known resources of food, timber, and ninerals of great value to the national economy, and may have much greater resources as yet undiscovered.

It is in the Nation's interest, therefore, for the Government to assist the balanced development of Alaskan resources and to help open economic opportunities on a sound long-term basis. I am recommending in this message a number of actions which will contribute to these purposes.

Since Alaska became part of the United States 80 years ago, a certain amount of development has taken place. A number of industries, principally fisheries and mining, have been established, although unfortunately they have followed too largely the pattern of absentee ownership and exploitation. During the recent war, when the strategic importance of Alaska became obvious, a number of extensive military installations were built or started there. 1. Statehood for Alaska

Some 94,000 people now reside in the Territory, and the population is growing. Alaska residents deeply desire statehood. A large proportion of them are from the States and share our long tradition of selfgovernment. Alaska has a larger population and a stronger economic base than did many of our present States when they were admitted

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

to the Union. It has had Territorial government for more than 35 years, surely a sufficient period of preparation for its admission as a State.

I believe, therefore, that we should admit Alaska to statehood at the earliest possible date, and I urge the Congress to enact the necessary legislation. I am pleased to note that the Committee on Public Lands of the House of Representatives has unanimously recommended such legislation.

It is important to remember that after the Congress acts, it will still be necessary to hold a constitutional convention, draft a constitution, and submit it to the voters for approval before statehood is achieved. Since these steps will require at least a year, they should be started as soon as possible.

Statehood will bring many advantages to the people of Alaska. Most important, it will give them a much greater opportunity to manage their own affairs; they will have the benefits of local freedom and initiative inherent in our system of democratic government. They will be able to put into effect much more fully their own concept of the unified development of all the resources of their vast territory.

In addition, when Alaska is a State, its people will be able to do much for themselves which they now find difficult or impossible. For example through their State government a sound, modern tax structure can be established to replace the present obsolete and inadequate system prescribed 35 years and more ago by the Federal Government. Alaskans will also be able to provide more adequately for education and health, problems which are especially difficult under frontier conditions.

Moreover, statehood will permit Alaskans to take a greater part in the affairs of the Nation. Through voting representation in the Congress and participation in national elections, they will have a direct voice in national decisions. At the same time, as a State Alaska will participate fully in many national programs, such as the Federal-aid highway program, which are now withheld unless special legislation is passed.

While statehood is a wise and necessary step, certain other immediate actions should also be taken, if Alaskans are to achieve steady and balanced industrial, agricultural, and community growth. 2. Improving the transportation system

In many respects, Alaska is still a pioneer land, and one of the principal problems is that of developing a satisfactory transportation system. The Territory is about one-fifth the size of the United States, yet has less highway or railroad mileage than many of our smaller States. It is a country of vast distances, sparsely settled, which together with difficult weather conditions and terrain creates unique transportation problems.

Under these circunstances, the Federal Government has a special responsibility to help in improving the transportation system. Traditionally, the Government has aided the development of transportation in frontier areas. From the standpoint both of military and civilian development, much needs to be done immediately to improve transportation in Alaska.

Nearly all the freight and many of the passengers carried between the States and Alaska move by sea. The only access by land is over

« ForrigeFortsett »